(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Pilgrim"

UOItE 





v 





H 



[NLL 
203 







m* 



THE PILGRIM 

Volume XVII Plymouth, Mass., June, 1938 No. 1 

Published this year as a Senior Year Book 



1937 THE PILGRIM STAFF 1938 

Editor-in-Chief Philip Godfrey 

Assistant Editor-in-Chief - - Nahum Morse 

Literary Editor Jeanette Hatton 

Junior Literary Editor - -- Betty Coleman 

Sophomore Literary Editor Lewis Morton 

Business Manager - - - Francis Scheid 

. .,,-„.,, \ Richard Tubbs 

Assistant Business Managers Brooks Barnes 

R , , , . \ Leo Roberge 

tfoys Atnietics - j Bartholomew Brigida 

Girls' Athletics --- Brooks Barnes 

Art - ...._.__ Henry Bastoni 

Assistant Art -- Linda Longinotti 

Exchange Carol Handy 

Assistant Exchange - ANNE BEAMAN 

French Editor - Florence Canucci 

Latin Editor -- ._.-.. Janet Broadbent 

Alumni Editor ALICE RlLEY 

Assistant Alumni Editor ---- Emily McEwen 

Joke Editor ------- -..-._ George Heath 

Assistant Joke Editor - - Ralph Beaman 

School News Editor Marjorie Decker 

Assistant School News Editor Madeline Baker 

. ^ , \ Betty Studley 

Senior Features - - "} Marion Treglown 

Candid Camera \ Vernon KlRKEY 

uanaia camera j Francis Kritzmacher 

Clubs Arnold Torrance 



CONTENTS 



COMMENCEMENT page 

Fall In ! - - - 5 

Attention ! - 6 

Forward March! ------ 7 

On Parade !--------- .__.._ io 

A Tribute To Our Best Citizen - - - - 20 

Nealo Haira Says - - - ___________ 21 

P. H. S. Day By Day ---------- 21 

Dotty Biographies ------------- 22 

How History Changes ! ______ 22 

Appropriate Lines -------- ___ 22 

Notes On The Faculty - - - - - - - - 23 

Could It Be! - - - .____._ 24 

Principal's Column ------------------ 25 

Class Song --------------------- 25 

Class Poem - - - - - 28 

LITERATURE 

Why Men Leave Home - - - - 27 

That Frivolous Fruit ------- -.___. 27 

One Knight of Love ------------------ 28 

Junior Poetry Page ------------------ 29 

Incident In Early Morning --- ___.___. 39 

Another Spring ------------------- 32 

The Chair --------------------- 33 

Plaid Trousers -------------------- 33 

Sophomore Poetry Page -- 35 

Sophomore Cartoon Page ---------------- 36 

ACTIVITIES 

Excerpts from the Diary of P. H. S. 37 

"Alumni, Please Take Notice" --------------- 38 

Foreign Languages ------ - 40 

EXCHANGES - - .-._--__ 43 

CANDIDLY YOURS 44 

CLUB NEWS 46 

ATHLETICS - 50 

JOKES 55 



THE PILGRIM 




With sincerest good wishes we dedicate this issue 
of "The Pilgrim" to Mr. Wayne M. Shipman 
on this, his tenth, anniversary as principal of 
Plymouth High School. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/pilgrim1938plym 



THE PILGRIM 



Class of 1938 
of 



Plymouth High School 



OFFICERS 
President ------ - Francis Scheid 

Vice-President -.._ Barbara Paty 

Secretary - - - -... Helen Belcher 

Treasurer -------- Arnold Torrance 



CLASS COLORS 
Ruby and Silver 



CLASS MOTTO 
Non confectus sed initus 



CLASS FLOWER 
Red Rose 



FALL IN! 



FOUR years ago the 1938 Limited 
pulled out of the station amidst the 
clanging of bells and cheers of proud 
parents. 

Four years! Skirt lengths, bobs, and 
funds of courage have risen and fallen ; 
wars have begun and ended ; friends 
have met and parted. And after four 
years of mental gymnastics, our teach- 
ers are still our friends. 

Let's see where we have gone in the 
now famous Limited. We started in a 
dubious lot of wooden cars hooked to- 
gether with baling wire and promises. 
Now we occupy a stream-lined Diesel- 
electric job making its 110 m.p.h. in a 
pinch. Some class! Well, here are our 
principal stops — 

President — James Costa 
Vice-President — Barbara Paty 
Secretary — Margaret Mordt 
Treasurer — John Tavernelli 
Our first stop was in the city of 
Freshman. We were on our first trip 
from the old home town and we en- 
joyed ourselves to the utmost. Of 
course, we still had that young, inex- 
perienced air, so some upperclassmen 
took rides at our expense. 

We vividly remember a conflict in 
which we unwittingly became engaged. 
Our youthful hearts were set on a fresh- 
man dance. Unfortunately each date 
we intended to reserve was rudely 
snatched from us by some older class. 



Now we have learned to clench our 
teeth and keep our dates — boys take 
notice ! 

As ticket-sellers for the operetta, 
"Pinafore," we surprised even our- 
selves. The townspeople were besieged 
by a crowd of enterprising pupils in- 
tent on selling all their tickets. Our 
incentive was the fact that Edward 
Wright, one of our fellow travellers, had 
a major part in the performance. 
II 

Our second stop was in the city of 
Sophomore. Having been initiated by 
this time into the mysteries of city life, 
we were not so bewildered. Moreover, 
our reputation having preceded us, we 
had much less trouble in coping with 
our superiors — in age. 

In this city our officers changed. 
Francis Scheid was elected president. 
Roland Holmes became vice-president, 
while John Tavernelli did double duty 
as secretary-treasurer. 

This year we made the first school 
circus a success with the help of some of 
the pupils from the upper classes. In- 
deed, it was such a success that it be- 
came an annual affair. 

One of the most important events was 
the Sophomore Hop — at which we "hop- 
ped" away a perfect evening. We un- 
derstand that it is considered the best 
dance ever sponsored by Sophomores. 

Dr. Davis became a new inhabitant 
of this most charming city, and soon 



THE PILGRIM 



after his arrival he offered a scholar- 
ship to the one who possessed the voice 
with the greatest possibilities. Our Ed- 
ward Wright carried off the prize of a 
year's musical training. And it was 
"wright" that he should. 

In this never-to-be-forgotten year we 
had the inestimable privilege of study- 
ing to an accompaniment of riveting 
from across the street as the new build- 
ing was nearing completion. 

Ill 

Once in the new building, we Juniors 
became models of brilliance and ef- 
ficiency, electing as our class officers 
Spencer Brewster, president ; Francis 
Scheid, vice-president; Barbara Paty, 
secretary ; and John Tavernelli, treasur- 
er. 

Francis Scheid, our silver-tongued 
orator, won the district American 
Legion Oratorical Contest. He also ac- 
quired another title, that of State Presi- 
dent of the Student Activities Society. 
Spencer Brewster was chosen to fill the 
position of President of the Southeast- 
ern Branch of Associated Bodies of Stu- 
dent Councils of Massachusetts — which 
title, we believe, is the longest one ever 
held by a student in Plymouth High 
School. 

IV 

Our destination was that beautiful 
city, Senior. It proved to be truly a 
wonderful place. A dignified air of ac- 
tivity pervaded the serious atmosphere, 
and we felt that Senior was indeed the 
place in which to live. 
For officers we elected : 
President — Francis Scheid 
Vice-President — Barbara Paty 
Secretary — Helen Belcher 
Treasurer — Arnold Torrance 
Our Senior Dance was a decided suc- 
cess, one of those things carefully 
stored in the corners of our memories 
to think about in future years. 

Barbara Paty was chosen the best 
girl citizen in the Senior Class. 

And now we have completed our 
journey through the land of High 
School. If you ever visit this strange 
country, you must be sure to look to- 
wards the golden city, Success, on the 
top of the hill. There on the tracks will 
be the 1938 Limited going steadily up 
the incline. 

Toot! Toot! 

Constance Kellen 



ATTENTION! 

HAVING successfully survived the 
perplexites of high school life and 
unexpectedly finding ourselves the 
proud possessors of prodigious posses- 
sions, we, the opulent and philanthropic 
Class of 1938, do hereby bequeath the 
following to the persons herein speci- 
fied : 

To Mr. Shipman : A television adap- 
tation for his cherished public address 
system. (It is our opinion that gesti- 
culation would make announcements 
more impressive.) 

To Mrs. Raymond: A beautiful, 
white, hard-rubber bulletin board of the 
washable type for Room 301. We are 
desirous of eliminating any possibility 
of shock in case pupils in the future 
decide to use superfluous amounts of 
paste. 

To Miss McNerny : Congratulations ! 
Now she has a real opportunity to dis- 
play her culinary prowess. 

To Mr. Bagnall: A sumptuous easy 
chair next to the window at the cele- 
brated Old Colony Club, to be reserved 
only for him. 

To Miss Carey: A costly camera of 
reliable make with which she may take 
an abundance of excellent pictures the 
next time she journeys to France. 

To Mr. Smiley: An air-tight, glass 
anatomizing box fitted with a chimney 
to remove any obnoxious odors which 
may chance to issue from his defunct 
cats. 

To Miss Rafter: A replica of that 
oft-discussed mace of Congress, to be 
used upon any recalcitrant history stu- 
dent on that part of his anatomy where 
it will do the most good. 

To Mr. Mongan: A special pair of 
study-hall slippers with thick heels of 
sponge rubber, so that meditating stu- 
dents (if there be any) will not be 
brusquely disturbed whenever he is 
called without. 

To Miss Judd : Stationary desks for 
203. (We know the possibilities of 
equipment not attached to the floor.) 

To Mr. Packard : Photo-electrically- 
controlled curtains for his physics room. 
We seek to save him the annoyance of 
keeping Old Sol from vexing the optics 
of cogitating students. 

To Miss Locklin : A complete set of 
polyhedrons to save her the inconven- 
ience of juggling books, pencils, rulers, 
and all else that may lie in the immed- 
iate vicinity, to picture the various 
geometrical figures for her solid classes. 



THE PILGRIM 



To Miss Kelly : A taxi with a burly 
chauffeur to "whisk" her to the quiet of 
her home at the close of school. 

To Miss Lang: A fire-gong for her 
classroom so that pupils need not be 
continually reminded that the bell has 
rung. 

To Mrs. Sharkey: A large roll of 
adhesive tape for the discouragement 
of the garrulous. 

To Miss Boucher: Our sincere hope 
that she may forever survive those 
weird dishes concocted by the senior 
chefs. 

To Miss Humphrey: Our most sin- 
cere hope that she may succeed in her 
new endeavor. 

To Miss Coombs: An endless belt 
back to the corridor to remove those 
who, if offered any encouragement, 
would linger for a pleasant chat with a 
pleasant secretary. 

To the Misses Johnson: Mono- 
grammed brooches, on the condition that 
they be conspicuously worn whenever in 
school so that we may learn, at once and 
for all time, which is Helen C. and 
which is Helen M. It is becoming de- 
cidedly trite to refer to them as 'the 
big one" and "the little one." 

To Dr. Davis: An automatic spray 
gun so that his gifted musicians may 
"butter their music." 

To Miss Dowling: Our deep apprec- 
iation for her splendid cooperation 
whenever we were in need of super- 
vision in her field. 

To Mr. Knowlton: A sign boldly 
inscribed with the words, "Director of 
Physical Education," to be mounted 
above his office door. 

To Miss Wilber: Our permission to 
convert Room 306 into a luxurious sa- 
lon, with the restriction that it be used 
only by those privileged to attend her 
gala Latin parties. 

To Mr. Garland: An invitation to 
demonstrate his vocal talent to the up- 
per school. 

To Miss Jacques : Because her room 
is so conveniently located, a stop-watch 
to time the superhuman speeds of stu- 
dents racing to school at one minute to 
eight. 

To Mrs. Garvin : The suggestion 
that girls' basketball games precede the 
boys' on the regular Friday night sched- 
ule. (Very definitely this would in- 
crease the gate receipts.) 

To the Class of 1939: Benches 
along the upper corridor. We seek to 



save you the agonies we experienced 
whenever we managed surreptitiously 
to steal from utility period. (Inciden- 
tally, it may please the recipients to 
know that this suggestion was made by 
a member of the faculty.) 

To the Class of 1940: A bottle of 
that world-reknowned "Stretcholene" 
for the astonishingly large number of 
diminutive persons in it. (Incidentally, 
we are also including a tank of "Shrink- 
olene" for one Monsieur Brewer.) 

Signed sealed, published, and de- 
clared by the members of the above- 
named Class of 1938, as and for their 
last Will and Testament, hereby revok- 
ing all former Wills and Codicils which 
may have been devised by us. 

In witness whereof, we hereunto have 
affixed our signatures : 
Jodge E. Podgy 
Jack B. Nimble 

Amedeo Galavani 
Wilfred Cohen 



FORWARD, MARCH! 

PLYMOUTH ! The last town on my 
list to be canvassed ! I was engaged 
in building up political support for 
my candidate, Mr. Francis Scheid, for 
the presidency of the A. L. U. (Ameri- 
can Labor Union) . This organization, as 
you know, is the union of the A. F. of L. 
and the C. I. 0. ; the possibility of which 
was discussed widely when I was in 
high school. Feeling certain that Mr. 
Scheid would carry his home town by 
an overwhelming majority, I had left 
it for last-minute solicitations. Lest I 
be found tedious for dwelling upon the 
political aspects of my visit, I shall 
merely tell you of the various positions 
which I found my former classmates 
occupying in the community. 

Thinking it good strategy to appear 
at my best before starting my political 
maneuvers, I entered a tonsorial shop, 
that of John Tavernelli. I noticed in 
his employ Letty McKee and Beverly 
Kaiser, manicurists, and Henry Adams, 
shoeshine boy. 

Once more on the sidewalk I gazed 
intently at the numerous commercial 
signs, and was waiting for officer 
"Butch" Torrance to wave me across 
the bustling thoroughfare, when Earl 
Young, street cleaner, politely requested 
me to stand aside. 

"Burlesque School," read the placard 
that most readily caught my eye. I 



8 



THE PILGRIM 



was greeted at the entrance by Head- 
master "Ants-in-his-Pants" Metcalf, 
while from the adjacent room flitted 
Sub-master Alfred Pizzotti, flanked by 
teachers Leland Nickerson, George 
"Mackerel" Fratus, and Howard Smith. 
By the headmaster I was informed of 
the spectacular success achieved by 
Janet Broadbent, Margie Decker, Don- 
ald Randall, and Albert Pederzani in a 
number produced by Harrison Griffin. 

While en route to my next prospect, 
my eyes were diverted to multi-colored 
flyers sifting down from an airplane to 
advertise "Belcher-Albertini Cough 
Medicine." I was later informed that 
the creator of this paper avalanche was 
Warren Peck, president of a flight club 
recently organized in the town. 

"K. K. K." read the lettering on the 
window of the next business house. On 
inquiry I learned that these well-known 
letters had lost their former significance 
to the world, and now meant Kirkey's 
Kandid Kameras. Inside Mr. Kirkey 
was talking shop with the owners of the 
Kritz-Holmes Film Company. 

Following a chat with these old 
chums, I ambled down to the Regini- 
Gray Gymnasium, where Warren "Pea- 
nut" Raymond was training under the 
management of "J. P." Govoni in prep- 
aration for his match with Gerry 
Rezendes for the lightweight champion- 
ship of the world. 

Our conversation was interrupted by 
feminine ejaculations from the far side 
of the portable gym doors. On inspec- 
tion I found that they belonged to Bar- 
bara Paty, Edna Gunther, Hilda Guid- 
etti, and Beverly Karle. These "Little 
Women" had recently been a featured 
attraction in a side-show as "The Only 
Pygmy Women in Captivity." Now, un- 
der the leadership of Marion Lahey, 
they were taking a course in body 
stretching. In a corner was Annie Stein 
accompanying them on a Tedeschi Spec- 
ial, an instrument endorsed by that 
world-famous jazz pianist. 

Lunch time was approaching when I 
departed from this establishment with 
several old cronies. We agreed on Zam- 
marchi's Cafeteria as the scene of our 
noonday repast. On the way as we 
passed "J.G." Govoni's King-Pin Alleys, 
we were literally thrown off our feet by 
the onslaught of Domonick Fratus and 
Clarence Johnson, still pin boys (still 
motion) on their way to Florence 
Canucci's Dog Cart. However, we ar- 
rived at our destination safely and were 
cordially invited by Proprietor Zam- 



marchi to view his culinary experts in 
action. They proved to be Wayne Allen, 
Dwight Harlow, Edwin Sears, and 
George Neal. 

We enjoyed excellent service from 
waitresses Ruth Jenkins and Arlene 
Giovanetti under the watchful eyes of 
Headwaitress Dorothy Ziegengeist. On 
our way out we bade adieu to Betty 
Watson, who was perched on a high 
stool in the cashier's cage. Despite our 
friendship there was no need to press 
payment upon her. 

Outside I parted from my friends, 
and with the hope that I would have a 
successful afternoon, I entered the 
Heath Building which belonged to our 
old friend George. My first visit in the 
building was to Leo Roberge, lawyer, 
who was preparing his latest case, that 
of Ruth Wood vs. Madeline Wrighting- 
ton. Each of these taxi drivers claimed 
to have had the right of way in a recent 
collision. Another case under prepara- 
tion was that of Marguerite O'Keefe, 
stage star, vs. Janet Perrault, news 
commenator, charging slander. 

In the hall I passed the owners of the 
Cotti and Malaguti Construction Com- 
pany, discussing methods of interesting 
the townspeople in a new high school. 

When I entered Dr. Edward Wright's 
office, nurse Elizabeth Anderson in- 
formed me that he was, at the moment, 
taking a trumpet lesson from the emi- 
nent musician, Chester Parsons. 

Upon my departure from the building 
I observed the Cobb and Robbins Sight- 
Seeing Bus just being piloted from the 
curb by Spencer Brewster. 

I was awaiting an interview with 
"Heart-Balmer" Ann Bittinger when I 
espied the early edition of the daily Pil- 
grim. One of the editorials that caught 
my eye was from the pen of Editor 
Philip Godfrey concerning the personal 
safety of American citizens in foreign 
lands. This had doubtlessly been insti- 
gated by the danger of our ambassador 
to China, Henry Bastoni, and the fash- 
ion reporters in Paris, Isabel Cravinho 
and Helen Darsch. I also noticed the 
displays of Handy's Candies, Riley's 
Pastry Pantry Incorporated, and the 
Lob Lolly Luncheon, under the manage- 
ment of Violet Boudreau and Marjorie 
Cassidy. 

On my way out I met Tony Valenzi- 
ano entering for his appointment with 
Miss Bittinger, closely followed by his 
bodyguard, Robert Birnstein. My! How 
the girls abuse those movie heroes ! 



THE PILGRIM 



Margaret Cook, Mary Cingolani, and 
Dorothy DeCost were parading for 
higher wages for models in front of Lil- 
lian Sherman's Paris Fashion Shoppe. 
Just then there emerged from this im- 
portant style center, Marion Treglown 
and Betty Studley, style editors for ri- 
val papers. 

Most unfortunately I collided at this 
point with Harold Padovani, sandwich 
man advertising "Cohen's Bargain 
Basement." 

A circus poster met my view depict- 
ing Lizzie Digenova, acrobat; John 
Darsch, strong man ; and Raymond 
Bocacci, fire-eater. All were in the em- 
ploy of the Great Demas-Branco Ten 
Ring Circus. 

The clanging of fire gongs lured me 
up a side street. When I arrived at the 
scene, Reporter Martin Brewster was 
photographing the rescued cat of house- 
wife, Mary Dugas, in the arms of the 
hero, Howard Courtney. Disappointed, 
I retraced my footsteps to the doorway 
of Margaret Boutin's palmistry shop. 
Inside she was reading the hand of 
Constance Kellen, leader of the Women's 
Foresight League. Jeanette Hatton, 
society editor of the Plymouth "Tellall," 
was lying in wait for Miss Kellen. 

On emerging from this establsihment 
I recognized Elva Mulcahey, foremost 
lecturer of the day on horticulture, urg- 
ing mechanic Amedeo Galvani to hurry 
his work on the carburetor of her 
streamlined car, manufactured by the 
Pearson - Lafayette Automobile Com- 
pany. At the same time, Alphonse An- 
drada, driver of Pedrini's Italian bread 
truck, was ordering Robert Paoletti to 
move his peanut cart from the only 
empty parking space on the block. 

Through the window of Miriam 
Young's beauty parlor I espied hair- 
dressers Leah Lodi and Evon Lee very 
busily engaged — in reading. 

Seeking a public place in which to 
leave election flyers and cards, I en- 
tered the new public library, donated 
to the town by the millionaire chess 
champion of the world, Armando Bar- 
boza. Here I recognized the girls at 
the lending desk as Marietta Sears and 
Charlotte Schneider, now slavishly in 
love — with books. 

When I returned to business, I pur- 
chased an evening edition of the Pil- 
grim at Peter Brigida's news store. On 
the front page I read the story of the 
defeat of Bartholomew Brigida at the 
hands of Donald Govoni in the annual 
clam-digging contest. Allen Bumpus, 
a dark horse, was a close third. 



As I rounded the next corner, I met 
Marion Parker, Rita Sampson's partner 
in the dog-breeding business, who was 
airing one of their pedigreed pups in 
front of Dorothy Resnick's boarding 
house. 

I entered a corner drugstore owned 
by Marjorie Drew. In the absence of 
the regular clerk, Eleanor Hall was do- 
ing her best at the soda fountain. 
Jessie Hollis was demonstrating the 
usefulness of Jean Murray's latest in- 
vention, the mirror clock. With this, I 
was told, I could compute the hour by 
the size of the reflection of my eyes in 
the mirror. 

In a far corner a radio was tuned in 
to the western music of Eileen Payson 
and her guitar. As some non-musical 
person turned the dial, I recognized the 
voice of Elsie Peccini offering diet 
hints, and that of Barbara Peterson 
playing the role of Ma Snerkins. She 
was supported by Brooks Harlow in the 
role of Shnuffle. 

The strains of "Sweet Rosy O'Grady" 
drew me from my lofty perch to the 
door. Immediately a terrifying creature 
attacked me with a tin cup. When I had 
made a contribution, his master, Joe 
Costa, delivered me from the monkey. 

My last visit was to a store on the 
window of which was printed "Furtado 
and Burgess Weiner Company. Hot 
Dogs— 20c a Yard." 

The owners of this establishment in- 
vited me to their tenth annual banquet, 
a gathering at which I would find the 
greater part of my old classmates. I 
readily accepted and was there early 
enough to complete some unfinished 
chats. 

After the main course, hot dogs, I 
knew no more until I awoke a week 
later in a hospital room. Even though 
I had nearly lost my life in the en- 
deavor, I was glad to have met again 
so many of my friends of high school 
days. 

Chester Moores '38 



HARBOR AT DUSK 

The evening sky is faintly flushed, 

A soft pale pink against pearl grey. 

The harbor sounds are faint and hushed, 

And echo dimly 'cross the bay. 

Sharp etched against the darkening sky, 

The spars of vessels, anchored fast. 

The seagulls dip and swoop on high 

Among the silhouetted masts. 

Betty Coleman '39 



The editors wish to thank Miss 
Judd ayid her typists for assistance in 
the preparation of copy for "The 
Pilgrim." 



ON PARADE! 



j^Oiw^ 



IRIDE ALBERTINI 

We've read her short stories, 
The news we relay: 
Life on the campus 
Enthralls Iride. 



ELIZABETH ANDERSON 

She'll mount her horse and swiftly 

ride — 
And who is better qualified? 
The race of life she now can win 
Before the others can begin. 




JANET BROADBENT 



) > 

"Janet is my name," said she, 
"I hope you won't forget. '■> u 

There's nothing that I dislike more 
Than to be called Jeanette." 



FLORENCE CANUCCI 

Opportunity for service 
She never passes by, 
On her sober judgment 
We've found we can rely. 



HELEN BELCHER 

We wouldn't be astonished 
If when this book comes out 
Helen has the honor 
Of being an Eagle Scout. 





MARJORIE CASSIDY 

She intends to assist 
In case Nature forgot to — 
Curly hair she will give you 
If you tell her she ought to. 



ANN BITTINGER 

Every morning before eight 
Down the corridor in a whirl, 
On a very big girl's errand 
Goes a very little girl. 





MARY CINGOLANI 

"Whatever's worth doing 
Is worth doing right," 
Armed with her adage 
She'll storm any height. 



VIOLET BOUDREAU 

Her surname suggests 
French temperament, 
But to no fiery outbursts 
Does she ever give vent. 



MARGARET BOUTIN 

Each one went to the basket, 
Each wanted gum to chew: 
Was it you who tempted him 
Or he who tempted you? 






&Vtt 



CJU 



MARGARET COOK 

Peg's latest passion. 
We've heard, is bowling: 
In the gutter it's easy 
To "keep the ball rolling." 



ISABELLE CRAVINHO 

She has a yen 
To own a car: 
With her shank's mare 
Rates under par. 

V 



^^ 




HELEN DARSCH 

We labored overlong, 
We madly tore our hair — 
But now we know the donor 
Of that little pin you wear. 



THE PILGRIM 






ARLENE GIOVANETTI 

A flash of knitting needles — 
A glimpse of something green- 
Arlene's the fastest knitter 
That we have ever seen. 



ko 



MARGIE DECKER 

We think she gets more fun from 

life 
Than anyone we know. 
With gleeful nods and wreathed 

smiles 
She sets all hearts aglow. 



DOROTHY DeCOST 

Upon the classroom quiet 
A maiden's scream rang out. 
No need to amplify it: 
Twas. Dottie's wrathful shout. 










HILDA GUIDETTI 

Blushing is said 
To be a lost art: 
We don't believe it — 
Come on, Hilda, start. 



(*M 




EDNA GUNTHER 



"Quality, not quantity," 
Is the thing that counts: 
Since knowing you, young lady, 
Our faith in the adage mounts. 



ELIZABETH DIGENOVA 

"I crave a career," said Lizzie, 
"For crowned heads I must 

dance;" 
"Forget that stuff," said Georgie; 
"While I'm here — not a chance." 





ELEANOR HALL 

She'd change her name to Elmer, 
She'd don a pair of pants, 
She'd turn herself into a boy 
If she but had the chance. 



MARGERY DREW 

Margie is the one to tell 
If you've a joke that's gay, 
It may not be so funny 
But she'll giggle anyway. 





& 



\€> CAROL HANDY 

We're very proud of Carol, 
We feel we have the right — 
For as our hockey captain 
She worked with all her might. 












MARY DUGAS 

If you crave a brand new frock 
But your funds are low, 
Take a tip from Mary — 
She knows how to sew! 



" 





JEANETTE HATTON 

For one who acts so joyous 
You're very mystifying: 
Why is it, in your stories, 
There's always someone dying? 



12 



THE PILGRIM 



JESSIE HOLLIS 

"I'm never going to marry, 
No man will steal my heart. 
I'll wed myself to a big career- 
You see, I'm just plain smart." 





EVON LEE 

Of those who could be favorites, 
There's only one on top; 
And though his name is Lawrence, 
We'd better call him "Pop." 



RUTH JENKINS 

"Ruthie" is a quiet girl, 

But secrets out will seep; 

We know this adage never fails: 

Still waters still run deep. 





LEAH LODI 

With serious and solemn mien 
She enters Learning's portals, 
But with ready wit and flashing 

smile 
Regales us lesser mortals. 



' V 



BEVERLY KAISER 

She's always completely 
Neat and sedate, 
From the tip of her toes 
To the top of her pate. 



BEVERLY KARLE 

With Mr. Jim Farley 
My name doesn't rhyme 
As I've tried to explain 
Full many a time. 






r» 







CONSTANCE KELLEN 



Connie has a ready smile, 
A happy mien has she, 
Perhaps we ought to hide 

rhyme 
For she writes poetry! 



this 



MARION LAHEY 

"Buttons" is popular, 
And, strange as it may seem, 
It really isn't just because 
Her father makes ice cream. 









& 




LETTY McKEE 

For one boy 

She has a wink: 

And she writes her notes 

In purple ink. 



ELVA MULCAHY 

Before she starts upon a venture 
She plans her acts with care, 
Always weighing every problem 
Before her thoughts she'll share. 



JEAN MURRAY 

She's a fine Scotch lassie 
Without any cares 
Declaring her clan 
By the tartan she wears. 



MARGUERITE O'KEEFE 

Lightly posed 
On her toes — 
Lovely dancer- 
Many beaux! 



THE PILGRIM 



13 



MARION PARKER 

With candy and ice-cream 
New pounds we are buying, 
But she keeps her figure 
Without even trying. 



BARBARA PATY 

When Barbara speaks, 
Harmonious sounds 
Fall on the air 
And joy abounds. 







Gh 




DOROTHY RESNICK 

Some girls choose idols 
Just for a lark, 
But she's ever faithful 
To one Buddy Clark. 



ANNA RILEY 

She can make a Stradivarius 
Sweetly sing or sigh; 
But we like her better for 
That twinkle in her eye. 



EILEEN PAYSON 

Eileen has a weakness, 
Yet she doesn't need a pill! 
She likes them dark and hand- 
some, 
If you doubt us, just ask Phil. 





ELSIE PECCINI 

Elsie is mercurial: 
First she's up, then she's down, 
In quick succession she bestows 
Her lightest laugh, her deepest 
frown. 





OM'^-\ 



ALICE RILEY 

For Allie "A's" are nothing new, 
She gets them all the time: 
We feel her failures will be few 
As upward she will climb. 



RITA SAMPSON 



A whizz — a flash, 
A streak of gray! 
It's Rita's car — 
She's on her way! 



JANET PERRAULT 

A little girl 
Is Janet Perrault: 
Why won't she try 
Drinking Cocomalt? 





BARBARA PETERSON 

A silent and retiring miss 
Who speaks in tones so low 
She startled us in class one day 
By crying out, "No, No!" 







i __ 



CHARLOTTE SCHNEIDER 

If you think you are Jack Benny, 

On Charlotte try your wit. 

No half-baked jokes will get a 

laugh — 
But you might make a hit. 



MARIETTA SEARS 

Out a-boating she did go 
One summer day not long ago: 
From the boat fair maiden fell, 
And for help was forced to yell. 



'/%? 



14 



THE PILGRIM 



LILLIAN SHERMAN 

Letters here, letters there, 
Letters, letters everywhere; 
Lil will gladly correspond 
If you'll promise to respond. 



4* 



iy> 



NIE STEIN 



We've had our G-Men on the job. 
But they admit they've flopped: 
Why you are labelled "Pinky" 
Has our best sleuths stopped. 



^s^P^^ 



It 



BETTY STUDLEY 



was just some news 
Kingston, 
If we can credit what we hear 
That caused her eyes to twinkle 
And a smile from ear to ear. 



- 










MARION TREGLOWN 



A friend in need is Webster 
When with her we talk, 
Her voluble discourses 
Give us such a shock! 



BETTY WATSON 

Betty goes to Brockton, 
For what she doesn't say — 
So at this time and in this rhyme 
Our suspicions we relay. 



RUTH WOOD 

One day Ruth went riding 

Upon a lively horse, 

But when he threw her to 

ground 
She soon knew who was boss. 




MADELINE WRIGHTINGTON 

In our halls of learning 
She's o_uiet as can be: 
But when dismissal's sounded, 
She acts quite differently. 



MIRIAM YOUNG 

She said in class 
The other day 
She wouldn't change 
Her name for pay. 



DOROTHY ZIEGENGEIST 

The smile of health 
That is hard to suppress 
Is a source of wealth 
Dot has to excess. 



HENRY ADAMS 

A waggish, wild and woolly wit 
The party's life, 'tis true, 
Without our famous "Yogi" 
What would Mr. Mongan do? 



WAYNE ALLEN 

'Neath the basket he's a wonder. 
On the diamond he's a wow! 
Now you ask, "Can he play foot- 
ball?" 
Of course he can— and how! 



ALPHONE ANDRADA 

His weaknesses are very few 
Or else he hides them well; 
For, though our ear is to 

ground, 
We've no tall tales to tell. 



the 



THE PILGRIM 



15 



ARMANDO BARBOZA 

Of him we're rather envious 
For he never has to hike: 
He may drive a shiny auto 
Or pedal a bright red "bike." 



HENRY BASTONI 

Artistic ability 
You do possess. 
But your accounting 
Is just a plain mess. 



ROBERT BIRNSTEIN 



With his long legs 
He's ready to climb 
The ladder to fame 
Three rungs at a time. 



RAYMOND BOCCACI 

American Culture use to be 

Your very special meat, 

But now you take Commercial 

Law 
You aren't so hard to beat. 



u 



\S^X*CA>C^O 



ARMINDO BRANCO 



He likes to toy with model trains 
But do not think him queer, 
For in the end he aims to be 
A railroad engineer. 



MARTIN BREWSTER 

W. C. Fields played the old army 

game, 
But Mart has his own to show us: 
He doesn't use three shells and 

a pea 
But one good Whitman-bound 

bus. 




SPENCER BREWSTER 

Give him a mare 
That can take a high fence, 
That's all that is needed 
To satisfy "Spence." 



BARTHOMEW BRIGIDA 

A little knife, a pin, or trick, 
Bart always has a toy. 
If you ask us, he'll always be 
A bouncing baby boy. 



PETER BRIGIDA 

He was a dancing maiden 
Resilient as elastic, 
When in his lacey garments 
He tripped the light fantastic. 



ALLAN BUMPUS 

Slender of stature, 
Quiet of speech — 
Ready to learn 
What Life has to teach. 



CARLE BURGESS 

A little bit pessimistic 

Is our Rideout of the future. 

If you contradict him, 

Carley will turn and "shootcha. 



TALBOT COBB 

"Speak up!" We can't hear you!' 
Mrs. Raymond laments: 
But she doesn't ask you to, 
She has too much sense. 



16 



THE PILGRIM 



Wilfred cohen 

Do you want to argue 
About anything at all? 
Be it politics or peanuts 
"Kelly" Cohen's at your call. 



JOSEPH B. COSTA 

He's the kind of person 

We like to have around — 

He goes his way from day to day, 

Both feet upon the ground. 







LOUIS COTTI 

The fatal hour had struck: 
His debut was at hand! 
In the wings he pulled the ropes- 
He was the curtain man. 




HOWARD COURTNEY 

"Skee" Courtney is famed for 

hunting deer: 
He's a wiry lad, devoid of fear: 
Barbara's the "dear" he's trying 

to "kill"— 
If there's a way, he has the will. 




JOHN DARSCH 

The girls would like to ask you 
Where you got those auburn locks. 
And while you're at it, tell us, too, 
Who makes those hand-knit 
socks. 



JOSEPH DEMAS 

A stylish lad is Joseph D.. 

A Beau Brummell in dress. 

But when it comes to keeping 

books, 
He's always in a mess. 



DOMINICK FRATUS 

Though his visage shows no sign 
Of mischief or of prank, 
Mickey's hand's in everything, 
While his face remains a blank. 




GEORGE FRATUS 

Just a fish out of water? 
Or is this a game? 
We're eager to know 
Why Mackerel's your name. 




JOSEPH FURTADO 

Joe says he's quite an artist 
With needle and with thread. 
He says he'll mend you anything: 
It's the finished work we dread. 



CJL, 



AMEDEO GALVANI 

Diogenes sought one honest man, 
Searched throughout an entire 

land — 
Amedeo's on the trail of Truth 
With microscope in hand. 



PHILIP GODFREY 

He's a man of the press 
So he knows all tire news: 
At the drop of a hat 
He'll expound all his views. 



DONALD 






GOVONI 



If we were half as handsome, 
If we had for clothes your flair. 
We think we'd conquer shyness 
And seek the spotlight's glare. 



THE PILGRIM 



17 



JOSEPH G. GOVONI 

When he pens a billet doux. 
He follows a certain mode — 
To keep it strictly personal 
He writes the note in code. 





JOSEPH P. GOVONI 

Joseph must have built endur- 
ance 

For his long class - meeting 
speeches 

When he acts as guide each 
summer. 

While his classmates frequent 
beaches. 




LeBARON GRAY 

A final word of warning 
Lest your path be rough: 
"Never look for trouble — 
It'll find you fast enough." 




HARRISON GRIFFIN 

"Griffie" is a studious lad, 
A whiz at hockey, too, 
His given name is Harrison, 
But he'll be "Spud" to you. 




BROOKS HARLOW 

An engaging smile 
A cheerful "hello" — 
Brooks is the friendliest 
Person we know. 




DWIGHT HARLOW 

Some girls like the busy city 
Some prefer the country air: 
But we all vote for Manomet 
If only Dwight is there. 



GEORGE HEATH 

Sing a song of drumsticks 
With a heart just full of swing, 
And in it he will join you, 
Well bet 'most anything. 




ROLAND HOLMES 

Ask "Holmesy," — he will tell you 
What scouting's all about: 
He has first-hand knowledge, 
For he's an Eagle Scout. 



. 



-V 



/r^-isy 




CLARENCE JOHNSON 

In the classroom he abstains 
From all idle chatter, 
But on the baseball diamond 
It's quite a different matter. 




VERNON KIRKEY 

Some day when you're feeling low 
Or foolish as can be, 
He'll catch you with his camera 
For all the world to see. 




FRANCIS KRITZMACHER . y ^ j.* 

We know the reason > • / 

One Boy Scout fell- ^f***"***/ 
It's just that her dimples ' 
Photograph well. 




(t*tf>U~+y<. ^j 




CURTIS LAFAYETTE 

Curtis surely loves to talk. 
To make most verbose speeches, 
The time for class is almost up 
Before the end he reaches. 



18 



THE PILGRIM 



HAROLD MALAGUTI 

Oh. sing a song of lemon pie 
Or of biscuits for a change, 
This culinary cowboy 
Is at home with a kitchen range. 




THOMAS METCALF 

In size he's not 
So very tall, 
But when he talks 
He beats us all. 




CHESTER MOORES 

If we had a court 
And wanted a jester, 
We'd be amply amused I 
If we procure^ Chester. ' 






" W 




GEORGE NEAL 

He can't see why people 
Worry and fret, 
He may come to it later — 
No need for it yet. 



LELAND NICKERSON 



He struggles wildly 
Safe ground to reach: 
He's stuck in the mire 
Of his own speech. 



^ 



HAROLD PADOVANI 

Harold is our handy man 
With "floods" and "baby spot" 
When we present a "drammer,' 
We depend on him a lot. 




ROBERT PAOLETTI 

Poets sing in accents sweet 
Of lovely ladies tresses: 
But he can match them any day — 
Or we miss all three guesses. 



CHESTER PARSONS 

If some day you wish to melt 
Some young lady's heart, 
Just flash that gleaming smile of 
yours — 
It will act like Cupid's dart! 



GEORGE PEARSON 

Georgie Porgie, puddin' and pie, 
Kissed the girls and made them 

cry: 
Perhaps he did it on the sly 
Because we know he's rather shy. 



WARREN PECK 

In class he's rather reticent, 
At least he seems that way; 
But what he does outside of 

school 
Is more difficult to say. 



ALBERT PEDERZANI 

He has Astaire beat a million 

ways 
When his talent he displays, 
No matter what the time or place, 
"Arbie's" there to set the pace. 




RENATO PEDRINI 

You've heard the well-known 

saying 
That "Nato" proves is true, 
"If you are fond of people, 
People are fond of you." 



THE PILGRIM 



19 



ALFRED PIZZOTTI 

Mary had a little lamb, 
Its fleece was white as snow: 
But Alfred's pet is shining black- 
Its power we all know. 



UJL\fr\-W 



^ViA.VVAKJ 





DONALD RANDALL 

We see the good sense 
As we grow older 
Of one who won't carry 
A chip on his shoulder. 





WARREN RAYMOND 

He never says so very much, 
But o'er and o'er again 
We've all been told we must be- 
ware 
Of those dark, silent men. 




MARIO RE GIN I 

Your weighty discussions 
Nearly floor us— 
But, goodness knows, 
They never bore us! 



GERALD REZENDES 

Twinkling eyes and 
Curling hair — 
When mischief's done, 
He's had his share. 











GILBERT ROBBINS 

In two respects 
We think him wise: 
He neither grumbles 
Nor gives alibis. 




LEO ROBERGE 

As the "Blind Man" in the play, 
You really did excel; 
But with a certain senior 
You didn't do so well. 



FRANCIS SCHEID 

He's the president of our class: 
So please don't show alarm 
When we whisper to you softly, 
"He lives at the County Farm!" 



EDWIN SEARS 

Whenever he smiles 
His dimples show, 
This gets his "goat" 
As we all know! 



HOWARD SMITH 

'Where did you get that hat?" 
Is an old-time tune, 'tis true; 
But if we're not presuming, 
We'll sing that song to you. 



JOHN TAVERNELLI 

Johnny's our Latin genius, 
He excels in French aussi; 
But where he gets those haircuts 
Is a deep, dark mystery. 



WILLIAM TEDESCHI 

He shall have music wherever he 

goes 
And plenty of people around him, 
For he has only to touch ivory 

keys, 
And a music-mad throng will 

surround him. 



20 



THE PILGRIM 




ARNOLD TORRANCE 

"We wouldn't look so 

downcast." 
Say his friends with much 
"If someone would invent 

a game 
That Arnold couldn't 

win." 




&~ 



ANTONIO VALENZIANO 

Beneath his facile fingers 

form 
Artistic letters fair. 
And on the dance floor 

he becomes 
The answer to a prayer. 



EDWARD WRIGHT 

Whoops! my dears, 
Hold eevry thing! 
Here's a lad 
Who's going to sing. 



EARL YOUNG 

When our song 
Of youth is sung. 
He needn't worry — 
He'll still be "Young. 



LIBERO ZAMMARCHI 

No single human being 
Could, unaided, make 

such noise! 
Those who know what's 

what just look 
For Libero and the "boys." 



A Tribute to 
Our Best Citizen 

rf^HIS year the senior class chose Bar- 

bara Paty as its best citizen. For the 
past few years the Daughters of the 
American Revolution have extended to 
Plymouth High School the privilege of 
participating in a yearly contest to de- 
termine which girl of the senior class 
is the most outstanding in four respects : 
dependability, service, leadership, and 
patriotism. From the three girls chosen 
by the class itself, the faculty selected 
Barbara as its delegate to the conven- 
tion. To be designated as a best citizen 
is, of course, a great honor, and we 
know that in our selection we have a 
girl who truly fulfills all the require- 
ments. 

Barbara is dependable. She served 
our class faithfully and well in her 
freshman year when she was vice- 
president, and in her junior year when 
she acted as secretary. She is now vice- 
president of the senior class. 

Personality, self-control, and ability 
to assume responsibility are necessary 
to leadership. Barbara, although she is 
quiet, is one of the most outstanding 
personalities in the senior class. She 
is always friendly and cheerful, always 
ready to listen to the troubles of her 
classmates, always prepared to help her 
friends. She has proved her ability to 
assume responsibility by serving on 
committees for two important events, 
the Sophomore Hop and the Junior 
Prom. 

Patriotism is the last requirement. 
Her unselfish interest in her family, 
school, community, and nation has won 
friends for her wherever she goes. Our 
choice may be attributed, also, to her 
indomitable desire to do her best at all 
times and under all conditions, her ir- 
repressible spirit, her true friendly 
feeling for all her associates. She is, 
indeed, our foremost girl citizen. 



B. Studley 



THE PILGRIM 



21 



NEALO HAIRA SAYS— 

ll/JY dear, haul up a chair: the great 
J-*-*- day is almost here . . . yes, grad- 
uation . . . there are several thousand 
others graduating also . . . make you 
feel small? . . . Just as a reminder of 
bygone days . . . those assemblies in 
the old building sponsored by the home- 
rooms with all the dreadful suffering 
the leaders had to undergo, and the 
quivering of divers limbs; surely you 
remember . . . Many of the good deeds 
done in Plymouth can be attributed to 
members of the senior class, the most 
outstanding boy scouts being Roland 
Holmes, Francis Kritzmacher, Ray- 
mond Bocacci, Wilfred Cohen, Amedeo 
Galvani, and Vernon Kirkey . . . Be- 
cause we still remember Mr. Williams 
smashing the head of lettuce, we vote 
that the assembly, "Wonders of Liquid 
Air," be given the title of the most in- 
teresting presented in the new build- 
ing . . . It is rumored that the suc- 
cessors to Amos and Andy are Howard 
Smith and Eddie Sears . . . could be 
. . . Whoever thought of that "Washyer 
Windshield" program, anyway . . . 
To-day's favorite gag: Stooge — Who 
gave Lincoln's "Gettysburg Address"? 
Smarty — Johnny Tavernelli ... at 
that it's a safe answer ... On the 
authority of a certain biology teacher, 
most snakes are harmless. Okay, we 
believe him, but he and Professor Clapp 
may have our share . . . Because there 
are more boys than girls in the Class of 
'38, you won't see an extended row of 
girls in the reception line — we hope 
. . . The present senior class proved 
its mental prowess when Professor 
Myles gave those mental tests to 110 of 
us . . . Old helpful at the bat again ; 
the best way to gain the head of the 
cafeteria "line-up" is to practice at 
home. Jump at a signal and dash mad- 
ly down the stairs. Plan to have your 
family about to obstruct your progress 
... it adds the touch of realism . . . 
This is a sure thing, after two weeks 
you'll be in perfect form ... we aren't 
vouching for your family ... In words 
of a Southern slangster, the cup-cakes 
made by the male cooking classes are 
"creole," meaning "tops" ... or are 
they? . . . Why is it that almost every- 
one (excluding Bart Brigida) so hates 
to answer the phone? . . . shy little 
violets, aren't we? . . . And the one 
time when every senior wracks his 
brain is when he's trying to think of a 
clever remark to put in "Commence- 
ment Memories" under the column 



"Wants to be" . . . From the Class of 
'38 we nominate to the Hall of Fame in 
oratory, Francis Scheid ; drama, Leo 
Roberge ; music, Bill Tedeschi ; and 
sports, Wayne Allen. 

B. Studley 38 



P. H. S. DAY BY DAY 

DEAR DIARY: Suddenly occurred to 
me : There'll soon be a last time for 
that old school feeling. Makes me realize 
all the things I'm going to miss. 

Thoughts, while strolling down the 
corridor: If appearances aren't more 
deceiving than usual, there are shortly 
going to be several amateur comedians 
without an audience. 

How the times and styles do change ! 
Those vari-colored squares the girls 
have been wearing about their heads 
give a very youthful expression to the 
face. Perhaps they are the result of all 
the knitting that was done at the bas- 
ketball games the past winter. 

Questions that bother: Wonder why 
there is only one pane of clear glass in 
the classroom doors? Perhaps the bet- 
ter to see you with, my dear. 

Do teachers really have eyes in the 
back of their head? Or have we been 
deluded all these years? 

Wonder who was the ingenious stu- 
dent who thought of the paper in the 
locker handles? It saves so much of the 
valuable energy needed for more im- 
portant matters. 

After this we hope our esteemed 
elders will have nothing more to say 
about the apparent lack of feeling for 
the English language exhibited by the 
younger generation. One young hope- 
ful, relating a bicycling accident to a 
friend, said, "I descended the declivity 
with such velocity that, losing my equi- 
librium, my cranium came in contact 
with the macadamized road." Some- 
body must use the dictionary diligently, 
or is it just a repercussion from the 
assiduous ( ?) study of vocabulary in 
the senior English classes? 

The popularity of the "lyric of Amer- 
ican life" seems to be progressing right 
in our own high school. An example of 
one is that manufactured by room 301 
for a recent contest. 

Clip Clop! 
Hippity Hop! 
Blue and White 
Come out on top! 

M. Treglown 

(Clever people, the seniors!) 



22 



THE PILGRIM 



DOTTY BIOGRAPHIES 

U»RANCIS SCHEID . . . senior presi- 
*- dent . . . aspires to be a professor 
of mathematics . . . chooses hiking as 
his favorite pastime . . . states that 
people who talk incessantly and radio 
comedians who tell stale jokes are his 
pet peeves . . . considers winning the 
district elimination in last year's ora- 
tory contest his greatest accomplish- 
ment . . . was P. H. S.'s representative 
to the S. A. S. . . . belong? to the 4-H 
club, Executive Board of the S. A. S. 
and Pilgrim staff . . . member of 
Honor Society . . . president Sopho- 
more year and vice-president in the 
Junior year . . . hasn't decided on any 
college as yet . . . celebrated his 17th 
birthday last September 24th . . . was 
born in Plymouth . . . is 5 feet 8 inches 
tall . . . has dark hair and greenish 
eyes . . . likes sports and reading . . . 
says his success has been mostlv good 
luck! ! ! 

Barbara Paty . . . vice-president 
. . . born August 1st in Plymouth . . . 
5 feet of pleasantness . . . says she 
likes to knit ... is quite an outdoor 
girl . . . enjoys swimming, skating, 
and skiing . . . hasn't any definite 
plans about college . . . is an active 
member of the S. A. S. and National 
Honor Society . . . enjoys the antics of 
Charlie McCarthy . . . was class vice- 
president in her Freshman year . . . 
secretary in Junior year . . . pet 
peeves are rubber elastic and oral com- 
positions . . . has a grand smile . . . 
medium brown hair, blue eyes . . . has 
a lofty ambition to be the feminine 
version of Adrian ... in other words 
a dress designer. 

Helen Belcher . . . secretary . . . 
plays hockey . . . but likes all sports 
. . . ambition is to be a nurse . . . then 
to become the superintendent of a hos- 
pital . . . plans to attend Middlebury 
College . . . favorite pastime is knit- 
ting . . . prefers the color red . . . 
belongs to S. A. S. and Honor Society 
. . . plays in the orchestra . . . col- 
lects stamps . . . has no pet peeves 
. . . was born in Plymouth, March 25, 
1921 . . . owns a sleek black dog named 
"Gypsy" . . . is 5 feet 6 x /2 inches tall 
. . . has enticing dimples . . . states 
the only thing she ever won was a 
camera . . . but so far she hasn't be- 
come a rabid photographer. 

Arnold Torrance . . . capable treas- 
urer of senior class . . . collector of 
stamps and coins . . . likes history 
especially well ... in fact, plans to be 



a history teacher . . . blue is his fav- 
orite color . . . belongs to the P. A. A. 
and is on the staff of the Pilgrim . . . 
is planning to attend Boston University 
. . . likes swimming and tennis . . . 
also enjoys hiking . . . plays chess to 
relax . . . is 5 feet IOV2 inches tall 
. . . has dark brown hair and blue eyes 
. . . born in Plymouth, May 1st, 1920. 

B. Studley 



HOW HISTORY CHANGES! 

A MISTAKE is a mistake in any lan- 
guage, but American History, and 
then it is funny. 

A few of the prize "boners" made in 
an American History test will suffice to 
prove the point: 

"Stonewall" Jackson got his nickname 
from charging like a stonewall. (Some 
offensive !) 

The independent Republicans who 
supported Cleveland were Half-Creeds. 
(Out of the mouths of babes . . .) 

Question: Who said "A public office 
is a public trust"? 

Answer: Vanderbilt. (How you must 
have changed, Commodore!) 

The 14th Amendment specifies that 
no state shall deprive any person of 
crime nor shall any person be freed 
without two thirds vote of Congress. 
(That might entail some waiting.) 

Johnson was impeached because he 
violated the Homestead Act. (One guess 
is as good as another.) 

The chief issue of the campaign of 
1888 was corruption. That of 1896, 
storks. 

Guadalupe-Hidalgo was a writer. The 
Ostend Manifesto is a state in Cuba. 

In the Credit Mobilier scandal, shares 
of watermelon stock were sold to mem- 
bers of Congress. (Some people will 
try anything once.) 

Is somebody blushing? 

M. Treglown 



APPROPRIATE LINES 

"A man who knows but won't tell" 
— Vernon Kirkey. 

"Strange to the world, he bore a bash- 
ful look" — Edwin Sears. 

"Wisdom is better than rubies" — Mary 
Cingolani. 

"Thy modesty is a candle to thy merit" 
— Dorothy Ziegengeist. 

"Silence is the key to contentment" 
— George Pearson. 

"To be agreeable is to have friends" 
— Jeanette Hatton. 

"His greatest sin is a merry grin" 
— Alfred Pizzotti. 



THE PILGRIM 



23 



"Not that I love study less but that I 
love fun more" — Tommy Metcalf. 

"A little man who loves an argument" 
— Gerald Rezendes. 

"A pound of pluck is w^rk a ton of 
luck" — Anna Riley. 

"It's nice to be natural when you're 
naturally nice" — Carol Handy. 

"A still tongue maketh a wise head" 
— Gilbert Robbins. 

"All men need recreation, don't they?" 
— LeBaron Gray. 

"Bashful boys have many advantages" 
— Donald Govoni. 

"Laugh and the world laughs with 
you" — Howard Smith. 

"Sports stands high among her varied 
interests" — Marion Lahey. 

"Reward comes from honest effort" 
— Renato Pedrini. 

"A calmer maid is hard to find" — Bar- 
bara Peterson. 

"The future is purchased by the pres- 
ent" — Arnold Torrance. 

"Quiet, sweet, and a lady" — Marion 
Treglown. 

"A pleasant companion" — Annie Stein. 

'To every pound of work she adds an 
ounce of fun" — Margie Decker. 

"Friends she has many, foes are there 
any?" — Isabelle Cravinho. 

"Endowed with the sanctity of reason" 
— Constance Kellen. 

"One who does his own thinking and 
asks few odds of any" — Talbot Cobb. 

"Just rewards await the deserving" 
— Leah Lodi. 

"All musical people seem to be happy" 
Chester Parsons. 

"Every man is maker of his own for- 
tune" — Warren Peck. 



DAILY DOZEN 

CASEY sat on the curb whistling non- 
chalantly, put on one shoe, removed 
the other, and then wandered aimlessly 
down the avenue carrying it in his 
hand. 

Without surprise he threw hurried 
glances at the throng congregating be- 
hind him. He laughed to himself as he 
heard their queries. They, like all 
crowds, were curious, agitated over 
this seemingly foolish act. 

At the next three intersections he 
changed shoes and turned right. At his 
starting-place he peered uptown to- 
wards the Majestic Theatre. Again he 
glanced over his shoulder at the people 
following closely. "Not bad for a noon 
hour," he mused to himself, and then 
headed for the theatre, the throng fol- 
lowing. 

At the box-office Casey winked at 
the girl, purchased a ticket, and enter- 
ed the main lobby. 

Casey did not wait to view the fea- 
ture attraction that was starting, but 
made an exit through a side door. 

Once more outside Casey laughed, 
glanced at the tower clock, and slipped 
into a light roadster parked nearby. 

The "Ajax Advertising Agency" was 
doing a thriving business. 

Chester Moores '38 



Francis Kritzmacher, holding test pa- 
per : "Pardon me, Mrs. Raymond, but 
what is this little mark at the top of my 
paper?" 

Mrs. Raymond : "Why, those are 
my initials !" 



The Faculty 

Mr. Shipman 
Miss Carey 
Mr. Mongan 
Miss Locklin 
Mrs. Raymond 
Miss Boucher 
Miss Judd 
Miss Lang 
Miss H. M. Johnson 
Mrs. Garvin 
Miss Kelly 
Mr. Packard 
Coach Knowlton 
Miss H. C. Johnson 
Mr. Bagnall 
Mr. Smiley 
Miss Wilber 
Miss Rafter 
Miss Jacques 
Mrs. Sharkey 
Miss Coombs 
Mr. Garland 



Pet Extravagance 

Photography 

English muffins and tea 

Cigarettes 

Car 

Shoes 

Patterns 

Summer vacation 

None 

Flowers 

Her cat 

Magazines 

Radio 

Dogs 

Buying toy dogs 

Golf 

Losing golf balls 

Cats 

Gasoline 

$3.30 theatre tickets 

Lamps 

Candy 

None 



Gastronomic Delight 

Roast beef 

Tortellinis 

Everything except the tin can 

Hot dogs 

Fresh garden peas 

English muffins 

Raw carrots 

Steamed clams 

Chocolate cake 

Lobster 

Clam chowder 

Grilled steak 

Apples 

Chocolate cake 

Anything and everything 

Chocolate cornstarch pudding 

Chicken 

Grape juice 

Broiled live lobster 

Lobster 

Ice cream 

Steak smothered in onions 



COULD IT BE! 




1. Joseph Demas 4. Letty McKee 

2. Janet Broadbent 5. Edna Gunther 

3. Harrison Griffin 6. Margery Drew 



7. Carol Handy 

8. Helen Belcher 

9. Elva Mulcahy 



10. Marjorie Cassidy 13. Jessie Hollis 

11. Henry Bastoni 14. Henry Adams 

12. Leo Roberge 15. Renato Pedrini 



THE PILGRIM 



25 



PRINCIPAL'S COLUMN 

A BENEVOLENTLY disposed gentle- 
^*- man once asked a young man of his 
acquaintance this question: "My dear 
fellow, to what end are you directing 
your life?" The reply was "To both 
ends, sir. I work in the only first-class 
hat and shoe store in town." This was 
a very clever reply, I should say, worthy 
of Charlie McCarthy. Apparently he 
was succeeding in going in two direc- 
tions at the same time as well as John 
Brewer did when he went over the 
North Pole on all fours, or rather de- 
monstrated how it could be done. But 
this sort of thing obviously has its 
limitations. 

When your parents were graduated 
from high school, it was relatively easy 
to procure a job. The college graduate 
was almost sure of one. Very many, 
probably the majority, accepted the 
first reasonably attractive position that 
was offered. Many a star athlete be- 
came a bond salesman or an insurance 
agent, relying on his name and fame to 
bring him success rather than upon 
any particular desire for the type of 
work or preparation for it. But when 
the Social Security Act went into effect 
a year and a half ago and every em- 
ployed person was required to have a 
code number, statistics from New Eng- 
land showed that only a little over 5 r v 
of those who were working belonged to 
the strictly youth group, that is, those 
who were between 18 and 24 years of 
age. Further surveys have revealed 
that the majority of unemployed per- 
sons are likewise unemployable because 
they are unqualified for anything defi- 
nite or because they lack adaptability. 

Cameron Beck, director of the per- 
sonnel department of the New York 
Stock Exchange, gives an account of an 
interview he had with an applicant for 
a position. He was one of those self- 
confident fellows who could "do any- 
thing." "Fine," said Mr. Beck, "we need 
an assistant bookkeeper in the account- 
ing department." 

"Oh, I never studied bookkeeping", 
said the applicant. 

"Sorry," continued Mr. Beck, "but it 
so happens that the engineer would like 
to have someone help him with the 
electrical work here in the building." 

"Gee, I couldn't do that. I don't know 
anything about electricity," was the re- 
ply- 

Thus the conversation proceeded un- 
til finally Mr. Beck declared in a tone 
of undisguised annoyance. "Young man, 



you go out and prepare yourself for 
something definite before you waste 
your own or any one else's time. The 
day of the jack-of-all-trades is over. 
You must be a king of one trade. When 
you are ready, you may come back and 
see me again. Until that time, good 
day." 

A friend of mine stated the same 
truth in another way. When I was a 
freshman in college, he said, "If you 
are going to get very far, you must 
learn to do something better than some- 
body else can do it." And that's the 
truth. 

Former President Arthur E. Morgan 
of Antioch College states that in order 
to realize the greatest satisfaction in 
daily living one must have a well- 
rounded background of knowledge ; 
must experience growth through practi- 
cal work experience ; must learn self- 
direction in study and conduct; and 
must have a devotion to a life purpose. 
Yes, that is it — a life purpose, worthy 
of sincere, high-minded devotion, one 
worth sacrificing for. Its fruition may 
require a long, patient, sustained effort 
but the rewards will be well worth the 
cost. So in this day of uncertainty and 
doubt, let me say for your encourage- 
ment that there are opportunities 
ahead for those who have the patience 
and perseverance to prepare for them. 
Take every advantage offered by libra- 
ries, radio, developing hobbies, and, 
above everything else, if possible, by 
continuing your education in some sort 
of institution of learning. And remem- 
ber that it is far better to aim at some- 
thing and miss it than to aim at noth- 
ing and hit it. 

Wayne M. Shipman, 

Principal 



CLARION CALL 

Onward! seniors, mighty army! 
Let no hazards bar the way; 
Fix your eyes upon the future, 
Onward! seniors, march today! 

As the conquerors, old, to battle 
Valiant, marched in gallant throng, 
Let your footsteps follow after — 
Courage be your battle song! 

Forward! seniors, on to conquest! 
Triumph o'er the sin and strife; 
Ever in your hearts the watchword, 
Win the Battle! Conquer Life! 

Jeanette Hatton 





WARP OP LIFE 

BenEuth our eager Fingers, see, 
nyet-unFtnishnd tapestry; 
Each slender strand adau that's passed, 
ach varied hue,a lesson learned. 
Its brilliant pattern edged with red, 
a silver Thirty -eight "reveals, 
The nnlH shape we see yet clear. 
llur multi-colored threads we weave 
Into a Future, halF-concenled, 
And pray thnt we mny capture here, 
In glowing shades uF vibrant youth, 
THb Flaming, Jay within our hearts, 
fls on this Imiq uwuileri riuy 
We catch a glimpse oF liFc to be 
P undtmmed hopes and Faith in Cud 
Can Keep our threads uatany led, Free. 
Rnd when nt last our work is done, 
Mny He who Knows hnw every soul 
May climb From pettiness to grandeur, 
Rpprni9B our v/arK , rewarding each. 
Since an a warp with evils riFe 
We've wrought our dream,- a true, Full 



mwme^^M® 




mmmm 



TSSZL 



THE PILGRIM 



27 




WHY MEN LEAVE HOME 

"TT'S no use. chief, we've got to work 
1 all night." 

With this cheerful message still 
ringing in my ears, I left for home to 
eat some supper. At seven o'clock I 
returned to work and found a weary 
group of laborers. Some boys had been 
working all day, and the prospect of 
struggling all night was just too big 
a thought to cope with. The town re- 
port was due, however, and no matter 
how my boys were feeling, they had to 
work, and work hard, in order to get it 
out. But at the most, I estimated that 
we would be able to leave at about one 
o'clock next morning. 

At four-thirty we glued on the last 
cover, and then, saying little, we parted 
company. 

At five o'clock I stumbled into my 
front room and turned on the light. 
This was a radical mistake. There be- 
fore me, distributed about the room, 
was every book which had recently 
been in the standing six-shelved book- 
case. Reggie, our new pup, had evidently 
hit it just hard enough to knock it over, 
and this had frightened him so that, 
before he left the scene, other embar- 
rassing things had happened. I was 
tired, but I knew what Marge would 
say, so I picked up every book and 
cleaned the other mess. 

Just as I was about to go to bed, I 
remembered that I had not yet tended 
to the fire, so down to the cellar I went 
and did my duty. By that time I was 
so wide awake that I decided to read 
the paper before I retired. At six, I 
managed to doze off for perhaps half 
an hour, but about this time the dog 
began to whine under my bed, so I got 
up and locked him in the bathroom. At 
seven o'clock just as I was about to 
close my eyes, Sarah, my little girl of 
three, got up and decided to use some 
hot water. A few minutes elapsed and 
then I heard the swish of water and 
the pipe in the corner of my room 
started to go shhh-punk, shhh-punk. 
After a short time this ceased and once 
again everything was quiet, with the 
exception of the dog, which, having 
heard Sarah, began to whine again. 



At 7 :45 a. m. Sarah decided to come 
downstairs, so Marge waited until she 
got way down and then she yelled for 
Sarah "not to talk" because daddy was 
tired and wanted to sleep. Sarah mind- 
ed perfectly. She didn't make any noise 
at all witn her mouth — no — she just 
played the piano. But when a neighbor 
came in and yelled at the top of her 
lungs for Marge, and the dog stopped 
whining — and began to bark, and the 
pipes went shhh-punk, and the piano 
played, it was then that I decided that 
it must be time to get up and go to 

work - Philip Godfrey '38 



THAT FRIVOLOUS FRUIT 

EVERY century, from the first to the 
twentieth, has had its own form of 
dance. The earlier ones were, more or 
less, for a religious purpose — slow and 
mysterious or fast and frenzied. The 
stately minuet was the favorite of the 
gracious lords and ladies of the Colonial 
era. The Virginia reel, the clog, the 
cake walk, the Paul Jones, and the two- 
step were the popular American dances 
of the nineteenth and early twentieth 
centuries. They held sway for a while 
and then gave way to later innovations, 
such as the fox trot, the Charleston, 
and the Black Bottom. The twentieth 
century welcomes the Broadway, truck- 
in, peckin, and the Big Apple as the cur- 
rent sensations. The Big Apple, accord- 
ing to its creators, is a combination of 
past and present dance rages. To a 
rather conservative onlooker, it appears 
to be, rather, a combination of ludi- 
crousness and a mad desire to exercise. 
The dance was originally intended to 
be a thing of grace and beauty. The 
modern dance creators have an extra- 
ordinary sense of the beautiful. Their 
dances are a series of violent leaps and 
whirls, jarrings and joltings, wiggles 
and shakes, and what not. However, 
perhaps these dances do serve a pur- 
pose in their short lives. They do give 
the dancers some strenuous workouts 
and many of the lazy muscles are 
brought into play. Peckin is excellent 
for the stiff necks and the Black Bot- 
tom will do wonders in limbering up 



28 



THE PILGRIM 



creaky knee joints. But despite all this, 
anyone who has seen the Big Apple done 
as its creators intended that it should 
be done, will realize that it is not only 
inappropriate for the public dance halls, 
but it verges on the ridiculous. 

A group of students from a New 
England high school went on a strike 
recently and wanted, among other 
things, permission to do the Big Apple 
at their school dances. The principal 
realized the results wouldn't be too sat- 
isfactory and convinced the students 
that they should keep to their more 
conservative dance steps. 

The principal should be commended 
for his decision and the tact with which 
he managed the situation. Others in 
positions of authority over dance halls 
or school dances should cooperate with 
this New Enland principal in putting 
the "big apple" in a basket neatly la- 
beled, "For exhibition only." 

L. Lodi '38 



ONE KNIGHT OF LOVE 

HARRY BELL finished his meal, paid 
the check, and walked out of the 
"White Tower" into the drizzling rain. 
He climbed into his cab and swung out 
into the rapidly-moving column of traf- 
fic. Glancing at his watch, he noticed 
that it was nearing eight, the time for 
his rush hour when all society girls are 
leaving for their parties. Accordingly 
he turned toward Park Street where 
were located the fashionable apartment 
houses. 

As he came out into the brilliantly 
lighted boulevard, his eye caught 
sight of a pompous doorman in the 
doorway of the nearest apartment, and 
standing beside him, the most beautiful 
girl Harry had ever seen. He very sel- 
dom paid attention to girls but this 
one — well ! Harry drew up to the curb 
and got out to assist the dream in the 
royal blue gown and white fur wrap 
into the cab. The light sparkled on a 
beautiful coronet perched atop her light 
brown curls. He helped her into the 
machine and once more resumed his 
seat in front. "Where to, lady?" he 
asked trying to appear nonchalant. 
"The Hotel Carlson, if you please," and 
Harry's heart did somersaults at the 
sound of the low, vibrant voice which 
issued from the rear seat. He auto- 
matically made the turns, too full of 
wonder to realize what he was doing. 

As he drew up to the curb, she leaned 
over, handed him his fare, and hurriedly 



jumped out. Before he left, Harry heard 
the doorman call her by name. 

As he drove away, he wondered aloud, 
"Why the heck do all the beauties have 
to be society dames and why isn't one 
as nice as that one with a fella. She 
can't be a newcomer for the doorman 
greeted her like an old friend. What'sa 
matter with these society guys any- 
how? If I was one of 'em for just one 
night, she wouldn't take a taxi. 

Meanwhile Caroline (for that was her 
name) was wondering if she'd ever see 
her handsome driver again. She'd like 
to have him to ride to the hotel every 
night with. You see she always came 
here at exactly eight o'clock, rain or 
shine, and she never had, had an escort. 
Of course Harry wouldn't know this, 
being only a taxi driver, but the funny 
thing about "these society guys" was 
that they did not, as a rule, escort the 
hat-check girl to formal parties at the 
Carlson. 

Richard Tubbs '39 



EVENSONG 

Out, out 

From the still of the night 

Floats one fluted trill, 

Filled with dolefulness 

Mingled with mirth. 

It fades, 

And, yet, it cannot die. 

Its loveliness 

Is caught by silvery 

Dancing moonbeams; 

Gentle Zephyrus sings it, 

And breathes it softly through 

The shivering, rustling blades 

Of meadowgrass. 

Hark! Hark! 

Hear its echo yet? 

A dulcet tone from out 

The throbbing soul 

Of a thrush. 

Carol Handy '38 



THE HEATHEN 



Folks called him queer, — 

Because he liked to walk in April rains 

Without a hat. — 

A sure way to catch a cold, 

Anyone knows that. 

Folks called him lazy, — 

Because he'd rather walk a woodland path 

In early spring 

Than stay inside his stuffy store 

And hear the money ring. 

Folks called him heathen, — 

Because he stood upon the highest hill 

Midst towering trees, 

When Christian people were in church 

Down on their knees. 

But in spite of all that folks can say 
I have always thought 
He got more real religion in a day 
Than all their church-going brought. 

Barbara Paty '38 



THE PILGRIM 



29 



C3IIIIIIIIIIIJC3IIIIIIIIIIIIC3IIIIIIIIIIIIC3IIIIIIIIIIIIC3IIUIIIIllJIC^IIIIIIIIIIllC3llllllililllC3ItllltlMIIIC3C3liriMIIUIIC31ltlMIIMMC3IIIIIIIIIIIIC3llllllllltltCJIIIIIIllllllC3llllllllllllC31llltl 1 1 1 1 1 1 C 3 ) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 C3. 



Junior Poetry Page 



^^ C3IIIIIIIIIIIIC31IIIIIIIIIIIC3lllttlllllllC3lllllllltIltC3IIIIIIIIIIIIC3iailllllllllC3IIIIIIIIIIItC3llllllllll_llC3II t ■ I ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 C3 ■•■ ■ ■ I ■ 1 1 1 ■ I C3 1 1 ■ 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 J 1 1 1 1« I C3 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 111 1 1 ■ C2I 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 ■ ■ ■ ■■ C 3 ■ ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 f I C3 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 C 3 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 ■■ ^ 



JACK FROST AND MR. SUN | 

Jack Frost got up the other morn, g 

The Sun was shining bright; I 

He looked about, his pictures all 

Had vanished out of sight. g 

Jack doubled up his little fist | 

And shook it at the Sun! r ; 

And said, quite grieved, "Now just look here = 
And see what you have done. 

"Last night before I went to bed, § 

I climbed upon the wall | 

And painted every window-pane, □ 

But now you spoiled them all." | 

Margaret Rudolph '39 1 



SAINT GEORGE AND THE DRAGON 

Thundering, roaring, belching flame, 

Bellowing on to his kill — 

Who says Saint George is a mythical saint? 

He conquers the dragon still. 

He rides around mountains — 

He drives him with wonderful skill. 

Sometimes as the dragon comes bellowing 

by 
My heart thumps strangely with fear, 
And I fear he's eaten Saint George, but no, 
He waves, and I jump and cheer 
The dragon, who's only a railway train, 
And Saint George, the engineer. 

Virginia Vinton '39 



uiiiiiniimt)imiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiit]iiiiiiiiiiiij]iiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiMMiiiicjiiiMiiiiiiic3iiiiiiiNiNCK3iiiiiiiiiiiic3iiiiiiiiiiii»niiiiiiiiiit3iii nmn iiuiiiiiiiiiiioiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiidi 

1 MY ERROR | 

| INTRODUCTION | 

To say "I'm angry" to be sure, | 

Is always right where e'er you use it. | 

i To say "I'm mad" is English poor, | 

| But even so, we all abuse it. = 



p. So when to catch a bus in haste | 

| I bump my ankle on a chair, | 

| And then my shoe I find unlaced 3 

5 And leave the curlers in my hair, | 

| That makes me angry! | 

7 To wear my hat that I bought new I 

= On which Dad first rests his eyes, = 

And then he says, "A pan would do g 

g In which most women bake their pies," | 

| That makes me angry! = 

= And when escorted to the Prom i 

| By my first thrill in long white pants, | 

| And when the evening half is gone = 

= To learn my thrill can't even dance, | 

| That makes me angry! | 

| But — when to write a poem I strive, 5 

| For hours and hours, I should confess, | 

| And all my powers I constant drive | 

| And get this mixed-up, jumbled mess, 3 

2 That makes me mad!! | 

| Emily McEwen '39 = 

a loiiniiiiiiiuiii uimiimiiii] iiiuiiiiiimiioiiii; nun nit] ion urn am nlim uu uiiiiiiiiiiioiini hi 



PROUD BEAUTY 

Her eyes were green with yellow lights, 
Her shell-like ears were dainty, 

Her hair was patted, sleek and bright, 
Her attitude was saintly. 

Her grace was known throughout the land, 

Her beauty, pure, untainted, 
By every famous artist's hand 

Her dignity was painted. 

She lounged on softly-padded chairs, 

And at our admiration 
She moved her tail with measured care 

And mewed appreciation! 



TRUST 

Trust is a pliant thing — 
Resilient as a poplar tree 
Against the light blue sky; 
Beneath the wind's bludgeoning 
Though bent to earth, it rises free, 
Ermine wrapped, but straight and high. 

Trust is a fragile thing— 

As sensitive as a candle flame 

To scornful breath, 

And delicate as the tendriling 

Of flowering peas on a latticed frame— 

Whose loss is permanent as death. 



g Harriet Longhi '39 | Richard Schneider '39 g 
iniiiiiiiimitiiiiiiimiiiH C3III1IIIJIIIIC3IIM1I1I1IHC3 iiiicimi [] union iimiica unifies iiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiid iiuiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiminu ii 



30 



THE PILGRIM 



INCIDENT IN EARLY MORNING 

THE bed creaked as Irma twisted 
restlessly. It was time to get up 
even though it was only five o'clock. 
After all, her father had to be fed and 
Irma had to keep up the pretense of 
going to work. 

"I'll have to tell ma soon," she mused. 
"When I don't bring any dough home 
on pay-day, she's gonna start wonder- 
ing. But how can I tell her? She'll kick 
me out, I know she will. Ah, well, I 
might as well put it off as long as possi- 
ble. I'll tell her tomorrow." 

The sound of splashing came from 
the bathroom. 

"Pa's getting up. He'll be hollering 
at me in a minute." She yawned once 
more, then reached for her faded wrap- 
per and, stretching, she took her clothes 
and went to get dressed in the kitchen 
where it was warm. Not long afterward 
Mr. Madarasz came lumbering in. 

"Your ma don't feel so good this 
morning, so tell Anna to stay home 
with the kids." 

"All right, Pa, sit down and eat. It's 
most time for you to go. I heard a guy 
yesterday say that, the factory was go- 
ing to lay off. You aren't getting it, are 
you?" 

"Probably, you just worry about your 
job, Irma. That'll keep you busy. Is 
Mike up yet? No? Well, no wonder. 
He didn't get in till three. Said he was 
out with the gang." 

"Pa, I don't like it. He's always with 
that bunch and they're no good. Noth- 
ing but a gang of loafers and small-fry 
criminals. Why don't you do something? 
Make him stay away from them." 

Mr. Madarasz shook his head de- 
spondently, "It's no use. I can't do 
nothing with him. He's wild. And now 
your ma's sick again I've got no time 
for his foolishness. There's the five- 
thirty whistle. Hand me my lunch- 
pail." 

Irma listlessly closed the door behind 
him and went to rouse Mike. She felt 
ages older than her twenty-one years, 
ages older than her kid brother, Mike, 
ages and ages old. It was horrible 
struggling for an existence, surrounded 
by people, hundreds of them, in the 
same groove as she in this Polish set- 
tlement. Her* old man was working, 
yeah, but how much did he get? Not 
enough to keep six kids decently fed 
and clothed, and not half enough to 
give Mike a chance to get away from 
the tough gang he was traveling with, 



nor to get Anna the pretty things she 
craved, nor to buy Johnny the bike he 
wanted so badly and couldn't get be- 
cause every time he'd saved up some 
money from his paper route Mike bor- 
rowed it to pay pool debts. Helen and 
Maxine, the twins, were still too little 
to care about the small, dirty house, 
the greasy walls, the leaky roof, the 
broken steps, — but they'd learn to care. 
It was up to her. Irma, to do something, 
anything, to get out of it all. 

"I don't care about the others," she 
thought. "They'll have to look out for 
themselves. But I've got to have nice 
things, lovely clothes. I want to be 
somebody." She stood looking down at 
her brother, thick-featured and sullen- 
looking even in sleep. She shook him 
roughly, staring with repugnance. 

"How awful he looks," she pondered, 
"after one of those all-night parties!" 

Mike groaned and sat up rubbing his 
head. "Wotta night, Wotta night." 

"Yeah, I can imagine. How much did 
you lose?" 

"Nothing, so you can quit harping 
on that right away. I saw Big Dan last 
night. He's promised me a job. Says he 
needs a guy with guts. I'm in the 
dough." 

"Oh, Mike, you're not going to work 
for him. He's crooked, everyone knows 
that." 

"Well, what about it? He's got a sys- 
tem that's oke. If that guy's behind 
you, you're all set." 

"Set for where? Sing-Sing?" 

"Don't be funny. He has friends 
everywhere. You can't get caught. It's 
simple. All I have to do is go around 
and 'interview' the girls in the factory. 
I tell 'em they pay me 10% of their pay 
or else, if they don't kick in, they get 
fired. The foreman's a friend of Big 
Dan's. He gets his cut, I get mine, the 
rest goes to Big Dan, and we're all 
happy." 

Irma went out of the room. She took 
her shabby coat from the overcrowded 
closet. Well, after all, was it Mike's 
fault? How was he to know that Big 
Dan had "interviewed" her only three 
days ago? She pulled on a hat. The boss 
was a friend of Dan's all right. After 
Dan had told him that she hadn't paid 
her 10% for two weeks, he let her go, 
didn't he? Well, that proved it. Mike 
didn't know. What was the use? She 
softly shut the door and slowly walked 
away toward the river, just a slim out- 
line in the cold, gray light of dawn. 

B. Studley '38 




PILGRIM STAFF 

First Row: J. Hatton, B. Barnes, A. Riley, J. Broadbent. B. Brigida, R. Beaman, I. 

Albertini 
Second Row: M. Treglown, M. Decker, A. Torrance, B. Stuidley, P. Godfrey, F. Kritz- 

maoher, H. Bastoni 
Third Row: F. Scheid, L. Morton, A. Beaman, B. Coleman, L. Roberge, E. Mongan, V. 

Kirkey 
Fourth Row: E. McEwen, C. Handy, F. Canucci, Mrs. Raymond, R. Tubbs 




■ 



HONOR GROUP 

First Row: H. Guidetti, M. Cook, A. Riley, I. Albertini 
Second Row: J. Hatton, M. Cingolani, H. Belcher, F. Canucci, L. Lodi 
Third Row: F. Scheid, T. Cobb, A. Branco, J. Tavernelli, L. Roberge, A. Galvani, R. 
Pedrini 



32 



THE PILGRIM 



ANOTHER SPRING 

ENGULFED in dreamy memories, 
Martha Hanley sat knitting in her 
old leather-backed rocker. The cheery 
sunlight was shining in through the 
bedroom window in a scintillating 
stream. A beautiful butterfly was just 
emerging from her winter cocoon, as 
the first timid shoots of the vernal 
season were pushing up through the 
warming earth. Twittering birds flit- 
ted gayly through the budding tree tops 
uttering joyous songs which gladdened 
many a winter-weary ear. In the streets 
and. lanes below, the excited cries of 
children could be heard as they played 
at marbles or jump-rope or, perhaps, a 
little preliminary baseball. Yes, it was 
another spring! 

The old woman sitting so wrapt in 
her thoughts was not dreaming of this 
year's awakening, however, but of one 
long ago. She had been young then, and 
lovely, a charming belle in the quiet lit- 
tle town of Milson. All the gay young 
swains in the vicinitv had buzzed round 
her like a swarm of bumble bees. Ah, 
indeed life had been happy then ! 

She sighed deeply and the ghost of a 
smile flitted across her wan countenance 
as she recalled the distant past. 

In time, of course, Martha had made 
her choice. A good "catch", too, the 
gossipers of the village were wont to 
whisper among themselves. Nathan 
Clarke was a man of considerable social 
position and prestige. His money was 
not to be sneezed at either in the ver- 
nacular of the townsfolk. Yes. indeed. 
Marthy knew what she was about all 
right ! 

In spite of these suspicions, however, 
Nathan and Martha were reallv deeply 
in love. Theirs was an exceptional en- 
gagement, as they seemed to be in per- 
fect harmony while in each other's 
presence, in complete happiness. In 
their great love, they seemed a perfect 
match. Too perfect, peimaps, for mor- 
tal beings! 

The wedding had been set for the 
first day in May. 

Martha started for a second, awaken- 
ed from her revery. Yes ! Just as she 
thought ! Today was May 1 ! Another 
May! 

What great preparations for the com- 
ing event had been essayed! What an 
exquisite bridal trousseau had been se- 
lected from the most fashionable stores 
of which the nation could boast! How 
many dozens of delightful wedding 



gifts had been presented to the happy 
couple ! 

The preparations were over; all was 
ready ! In the spacious Hanley mansion, 
everything was arranged. The bride, 
more lovely than ever before, stood in 
ecstasy, awaiting the propitious mo- 
ment when the great hall organ would 
peal out its solemn announcement of 
bliss. The pretty bridesmaids giggled 
nervously in the corridor. The guests 
stood and sat in the enormous front 
parlor, in terrific suspense. All was 
quiet. Martha, in her ivory satin and 
foaming, billowing, lace was never more 
in love than at that moment. Nathan, 
with his best, man, started down the 
winding stairs as the organ began. 

Then suddenly pandemonium reigned. 
Horrifying screams for help were heard 
issuing from the back of the stables 
which stood directly behind the house. 
The organ stopped on a discordant note, 
the guests rushed to the windows, Na- 
than hurried down the stairs. 

A terrifying sight met the spectators' 
gaze. Little Adelaide Hanley, sister of 
the bride, still dressed in her beautiful 
flower girl robe, was running wildly 
through the stable yard. Behind her 
tore a mad bull. This bull was often 
pastured in a field next to the Hanley 
mansion, but Adelaide, not noticing him 
to-day, had opened the heavy iron gate 
and entered the meadow. She had been 
intrigued by the beautiful flowers which 
grew there and desired to get them for 
her sister's wedding. This was the re- 
sult! 

As everyone stood open-mouthed, too 
frightened to breathe, Nathan sped out 
the door, and with cne blow of his hand, 
knocked th^ tinv girl from the path of 
the oncoming animal. He had saved 
her life, but in doing so he sacrificed 
his own. 

Horribly gored, he lay in Martha's 
arms as he breathed his last. Her wed- 
ding gown was disheveled and stained 
with his life blood which was so quickly 
ebbing. In his own horrible agony, how- 
ever, his one thought had been for 
Martha, alone. 

Writhing in pain, he looked into her 
tear-dimmed eyes and whispered, "Don't 
grieve, my dear. I love you always, now 
and forever. We shall meet again. An- 
other spring! Until then, goodbye, my 
darling." 

Martha sat dreaming in the old 
leather-back rocker. It was another 
spring! .... 



J. Hatton '38 



THE PILGRIM 



33 



THE CHAIR 

IMMOBILE moments. The gray walls 
of the room grew grayer as if with 
apprehension. Silence — then the rau- 
cous voice of the news-peddling street 
gamin — harsh, strident — passed the 
tightly-closed window. "Extra ! Extra ! 
Bonny Boy Benson goes to the chair 
this afternoon. Handsome slayer — " — 
He passed. 

No one moved. A woman asked the 
time. A stern-faced man in one corner 
glanced at a massive watch. Ten more 
minutes ! A sobbing moan came from 
the next room. This was followed by a 
hurried, low muttering as if a man were 
pleading eloquently in prayer. The 
moan ceased. Two minutes passed, then 
it began anew. 

The people in the next room shifted 
uneasily. Again a paper boy passed 
calling his tale of death. The mind of 
each individual held but one thought — 
the chair! Five more minutes passed. A 
fly droned. Two more minutes dragged 
away. The moan ceased and a sound of 
stirring came through the closed door. 
The door opened — the people jumped, 
and then self-consciously pretended 
that they hadn't. No one spoke — a short 
pause — and then — "Next?" asked the 
dentist's pretty young nurse. 

V. Vinton '39 



WANDERINGS IN A DEPARTMENT STORE 

Perhaps I had a thought of warming, 
Early on one frosty morning 
When autos in the streets were horning 
And windows showed their goods, adorning, 
As I entered a store ( its doors are yawning) , 
Perhaps I had a thought of warming. 

I saw all this by means of looking. 
Pots and pans for Mother's cooking. 
Rags for rugs of Grandma's hooking, 
Pillows and cushions for corner nooking, 
Disguises and masks, perhaps for spooking, 
I saw all this by means of looking. 

I glanced at these while there abiding, 
The sleds for coasting and for sliding, 
The bicycles for speedy riding, 
Skates for ice and roller gliding, 
Maps and gloves for travel guiding, 
I glanced at these while there abiding. 

And all around were people buying 
Odds and ends that they were eyeing 
Which were on the counters lying. 
Here and there were children, sighing, 
Occasionally a baby, crying, 
And all around were people, buying. 

If you read this little ditty, 
And think it just a bit nit-witty, 
On the author don't take pity 
For he wrote it miss or hitty 
And considered it not pretty 
(If you read this little ditty). 

N. Morse '39 



PLAID TROUSERS 

IT was another girl. 
Chuck's mother knew all the symp- 
toms. For two days he had wandered 
about the house in an impenetrable daze 
— calling the same telephone number, 
and pausing occasionally to catch his 
reflection in a mirror. Even now, with 
dinner half over, he was still in his 
room dressing for his date. 

Upstairs, behind the cover of his 
door, Chuck stood before a mirror, 
kneedeep in ties. There were stripes, 
plaids, and gaudy red ones with polka 
dots. Patiently, he tried them all on, 
making grimaces as he watched the re- 
sults. Then, finally, he found it. It was 
a fiendish shade of green, but to Chuck 
it seemed to possess the right amount 
of dash and sophistication. He knotted 
it, as though performing some sacred 
ritual, never once taking his admiring 
eyes from his reflection. 

Gosh, but he was lucky to be taking 
Adrienne out — all the fellows were 
after her — and she had chosen him. 
But then, how could she have helped it? 
With a deep sigh of self-satisfaction, 
Chuck turned sidewise and, squinting 
from the corner of his eye, studied his 
profile. It was magnificent! Yet, some- 
how, he wished his nose didn't turn up 
so — it didn't quite suit a man-about- 
town. But, suddenly, Chuck remem- 
bered the time — it was getting late, 
and he had yet to persuade Dad to see 
a few things his way. 

He made his entrance into the dining 
room after the manner of royalty — let- 
ting his eyes drop in cool recognition of 
the family. His- father gave him a long 
look and swallowed hard. Where had 
the boy found those hideous plaid trou- 
sers — and that tie! 

"It's about time you got here, Chuck." 

"I'm sorry, Dad," he murmurred in 
a detached voice, and continued to eat 
his food with a cool air of indifference. 
Then, suddenly, he wet his lips, and his 
father knew that it was coming. 

"Dad," he ventured. 

"Yes." 

"Dad, you see. I — well, may I use the 
car tonight?" 

Then followed the usual debate and 
Chuck's eventual victory. Finally, with 
a five-dollar bill in his pocket, Chuck 
sped through the dark street behind the 
wheel of the red roadster. 

Adrienne made him wait, but she 
was worth it. What a girl! She sat 
close to him in the seat, making him 
feel oroud and sophisticated. Sneezy 
Callahan would give his right arm to be 



34 



THE PILGRIM 



in his shoes tonight. He had pursued 
Adrienne for two weeks without results 
— but Chuck, he had technique! Adri- 
enne insisted on going to the Silver 
Moon. Chuck thanked his lucky stars 
for the five-dollar bill in his pocket! 

In the club they sat at a corner table, 
and Chuck looked around with an air of 
a conqueror. There were soft lights and 
a swing band — he 1 looked at Adrienne — 
this was living! Chuck lifted an eye- 
brow, (he thought he looked intriguing 
when he did that) and murmured to 
her in a nonchalant tone. 

"Wouldn't you like something?" 

That was just the beginning! Adri- 
enne was dainty and petite, but she cer- 
tainly had an appetite! Chuck watched 
her order disappear in wideyed amaze- 
ment — and then she ordered more — lit- 
tle sandwiches, iced cakes, and drinks 
and more iced cakes! Gradually Chuck 
began to feel vaguely ill! If Adrienne 
ordered anything more, he wouldn't be 
able to pay the bill. With a sickly smile, 
he asked her if she wouldn't like to go 
for a ride. 

"Oh, no, Chuck! I love it here. It's 
so nice and cozy. Oh, look, there's 
Sneezy!" 

Chuck looked up and saw Sneezy's 
huge bulk approaching their table. 

"Hi, Chuck! Hello, Adrienne!" 

Chuck never knew how it happened, 
but somehow more food and drinks 
came for Adrienne and Sneezy. When 
that had disappeared, they danced. 
Alone at the table, Chuck added for the 
twentieth time the bill the waiter had 
brought. There was no mistake. It 
amounted to $8.65. Maybe Sneezy would 
lend him some money. He knew it would 
hurt his prestige to ask for assistance, 
but it. had to be done. With troubled 
eyes, he tried to find them on the floor. 
The first few times he thought maybe 
he had missed them, but the third time, 
there was no doubt — they had gone ! 
So that was all his car and profile meant 
to Adrienne! Suddenly, he forgot his 
hurt vanity as he sensed someone stand- 
ing beside him. Glancing down, he saw 
two shiny black shoes, spats, and 
trousers — 

"Are you leaving, sir?" 

"Er — well — you see, my — " 

"$8.65, sir." 

Chuck stuttered and stammered — 
but he finally got the words out. 

"I haven't it — I've just five dollars." 
What followed was a nightmare ! An- 
other waiter came, then another, and 
finally the manager. 



"Well, sonny, how about paying your 
bill?" 

What did the man mean by calling 
him "sonny" ! But whatever he meant, 
in five minutes Chuck was washing 
huge stacks of dishes in the kitchen. 
He was through with girls — they had 
ruined his life! Suddenly he heard a 
soft voice. 

"Do you mind if I help you?" 

Chuck looked around. Gosh, she 
looked cute in that little white uniform. 
It didn't, take very long to finish the 
dishes after that. 

When Chuck reached home, he climb- 
ed the stairs in an impenetrable daze. 
This time it was the real thing. This 
time the name was Carole. 

It was another girl. 

Ella Vitti '39 



VERMILION 



Lustrous, resplendant, radiant, clear 
Color, darkening all others near; 
Magnificence standing aloof behind glass, 
Exerting a spell that will not let me pass; 
Color so strong, yet so dashing and gay 
That it dims all surrounding window display; 
Splendor shining on background of white, 
Deep, rich, red, velvet — beautiful, bright; 
Gowns of vermilion, lovely, sublime- 
Color I love, — I wish you were mine. 

M. E. Edes '39 



38 MARCHES ON 



(With apologies to Henry Holcomb Bennett) 
Hats off! 
There comes along the street 
A muffled tramp of marching feet, 
A flash of color beneath the sky: 

Hats off! 
The Seniors are passing by! 

Ruby and silver, oh, how they shine, 
Parading before us in an orderly line. 

Hats off! 
Their colors before us fly; 
But more than the Seniors are passing by. 

Short tests and long tests, great and grim, 
Composed at a teacher's fanciful whim: 
Dreary homelessons and long reports. 
Written amid disgusted snorts; 

Plenteous vacations and still that yearning 
For holidays but not for learning: 
Football heroes and heroes of track: 
Potential hoopsters and Sultans of Swack: 

Hurrah for the class so strong, so great; 
Hurrah for the Class of Thirty-eight; 
Pride of the High School for one short year; 
Hip! Hip! Hurrah! Let's give them a cheer; 

Hats off! 
Along the street there comes 
A blare of bugles, a ruffle of drums; 
And Juniors and Sophomores envious sigh: 

Hats off! 
The Seniors are passing by! 

Nahum Morse '39 



THE PILGRIM 



35 



C3^llllllllliriC3llllllllllltC3IIIIIIIIJIIIC3lllllllfllllC3IIIIIIIIIIIIC3IIIIIIIIIIIIC3IIIIIIIIIItlC3lllltlllllllC3llllllllliriC3llllllllllMIIIIC3IIIIIIIIIIIICailllllllllllC3lll1IIIIIIIIC3IIIIIIIMIIIC3IIItfl INI MIC] 

j Sophomore Poetry Page 

= IIC3IIIIIIIIIIIIC3llllllllllllE3llflIIIIIIIIC3llllllllJIIIC3IIIIIIIIIIIIC3llllllllllllCailltllllllllC3llllllllltIIC3lllllllllJllCailllllllllJIC3IIIIIIIIIIIIC3IIIIIIIIIJIIC3IIIIIIIIIIIIC3IIIIIIIIIIIIC3llllIIIIIIIIC3lllllllllJ = 



A MESSAGE OF SPRING 

Underneath the soft brown grass 
Runs a message, whispered low, 
Of a season, swift approaching, 
That the men their seed may sow. 

Seeds so small and brown and young, 
Going to the Father's soil, 
While the farmer, bowing, slowly 
Starts another season's toil. 

In the elm, a bird is trilling, 
Running up and down the scale, 
While the rabbit and the deer 
Travel over hill and dale. 

Once again the earth is soft'ning, 
Once again the earth is damp! 
Gently Spring comes homeward tripping, 
Winter starts his outward tramp. 

L. Bradford Morton, Jr. '40 



THE GREATEST TRIAL OF COURAGE | 

He fought in the Argonne Forest, 

And was cited for bravery six times; g 

He has captured men single-handed | 

Who were guilty of desperate crimes. 

He knows what it is to be stranded | 
On the polar ice, bleak and cold; 

He has been in innumerable shipwrecks; = 

Of his deeds many stories are told. j| 

He has hunted big game without weapons; = 

A leopard he killed with his hands — | 

He has twice been lost in the desert 

And wandered alone o'er the sands. E 

His adventures all prove him a hero 
Fit to be crowned with a wreath, 

But he always sheds tears big as gumdrops = 

When the dentist is drilling his teeth. | 

Charles Anderson '40 E 



CJIIIIIIIIIIIIC3IIIIIIIIIIIIC3IIIIIIIIIIIIC3IIIIIIIIIIIIC3IIIIIIIIIIIIC3IIIIinillllC3llllllllilllllllC3llllllllllllC3IIIIIIIIIIIIC31IIIIM C3 1 IC3III C3 il 1 1 1 1 MJ HtC3 1 1 1 1 MM 1 1 1 1 d] II I II IIMMIC 3 H1IIC3 

1 GIRLS I 

I Golden braided hair. | 

§ Wooden shoes, | 

g Snowy aprons, 5 

Lovely rows of tulips | 

1 Along the river bank, E 

5 A sunny sky, 5 

1 And there you see I 

I A Dutch girl! 

I Bright red handkerchief, | 

A full, colored skirt, 

5 Jet black hair 5 

E And olive skin, = 

E A vineyard, = 

S A sunny sky — = 

1 And there you see = 

i A Mexican girl! E 

I Sky-blue sweater, | 

I A tight tan skirt — 

= Blonde, flaxen hair, = 

ji Ivory skin, i 

- A rose-covered garden, 

= A sunny sky, = 

i And there you see = 

I An American girl! = 

= A. Rossetti '40 = 

"iiiiiii C3IIIIIH cam iiiicj 10111111 cam c] ic: 11110 lit] n 11 rim uiiiiiihiiiiuii niiinii a a 



TO A FOREST FIRE 

Tall geysers of fire — 
Why do you burn the trees? 
You growl 
and roar 

with just the slightest breeze; 
It takes long years 
to grow each birch 
and pine; 
But in a few 
small hours, 
Your ever-moving line 
can conquer all; 
You send up in the air 
dense clouds of black, 
and leave behind 
a worthless track. 

Tall geysers of flame — 
Will nothing ever tame 
your rage? 

Ralph G. Beaman 



•40 



THE SUNSET 

The autumn sun drops slowly toward the 
hills, 

As if to plunge itself upon the spires 
Of silhouetted trees, and thus release 

A burst of radiance from its inner fires. 

Now sinks the poniard to the very hilt 
And forth there flows a light as red as 
blood, 
To stain the clouded curtain of the sky 
Which, heaving on the breeze, absorbs 
the flood. 

The cool of night comes down on silent 
wings, 
A tardy flock of geese goes floating past. 
The color fades, the stars come twinkling 
forth, 
The moon comes up, and night is here 
at last. 

Caroline Russell '40 



C3IIII t ■■IIIIIC3ltlllllllllllC3illllllllllllC3lllllllllllllC3lllllt IHIIIC3tlll llltllllC3llllllllllllllllC3illtlllllllllC3ll»lttllllllC31tllllllllllC3llllllllltIttC3IIIIIIllllllC3ll]lllllltllC3llltitllllllC3llllilIIIIIIC3irillllllllllC3 



36 



THE PILGRIM 




THE PILGRIM 



37 




CTIVITO 



EXCERPTS FROM THE DIARY OF 

P. H. S. 

Sept. 8 

To-day my vacation ended and my 
doors are opened to the throng of 
hopeful Sophomores, radiant Juniors, 
and confident Seniors. The year of 
1937-38 has begun! 

Oct. 28 

Farmers, cowboys, clowns, movie- 
actors, Spaniards, Russians, Hitlers, 
Mussolinis, and historical characters 
invaded the gymnasium for the I. C. 
C. Costume Dance. Who says there's 
nothing new under my roof? 

Nov. 3 

Mr. Edward Matthews, director of a 
school in Antrim, New Hampshire, 
showed my inmates how to walk cor- 
rectly and gracefully. He had with 
him some hand-made shoes. 

Nov. 9 

Something very worthwhile happened 
to me to-day. The Plymouth Civic 
Association presented me with a con- 
stitutional shrine which will grace 
the study for years to come. 

Nov. 10 

As a reminder of the Armistice, "Re- 
turn" was presented by the Inter- 
national Correspondence Club and the 
Honor Society under the direction of 
Miss Carey. Laurels to the entire 
cast! 

Nov. 20 

To the melodies of Correa, the feet of 
the sports' enthusiasts danced happi- 
ly. The season may not have been 
an entirely victorious one, but the 
dance was a success. 

Dec. 3 

Another occasion for those who love 
the social life! What vitality these 
students have — at night! Gay deco- 



rations and the spirit of friendliness 
iilled the gymnasium. Hurrah for the 
Seniors ! 

Dec. 10 

Scenes from Shakespeare's immortal 
work, "Macbeth," were enacted by 
seme of the ambitious Juniors. The 
scenery and lighting were especially 
impressive. 

Dec. 23 

My Christmas vacation — much too 
short — was preceded by a production 
of "The Cathedral Clock." It was well 
done, under the guiding hand of Miss 
Locklin. 

Jan. 17 

Oui, mais oui ! "La Maternelle" proved 
my knowledge of French was "tres 
petit." In contrast to the weather, 
the movie was fine. It concerned the 
home and school life of a small 
French girl. 

Feb. 3 

Cigam skrow! I feel mysterious to- 
day, inspired by Mr. Evans, the ma- 
gician. He astonished many of the 
students with his vanishing acts, card 
tricks, and novelty feats. It's all in 
knowing how, 'tis said. 

Feb. 9 

Using geometrical pointers for ex- 
amples, Jesse B. Davis, Dean of Bos- 
ton University School of Education, 
explained how to attain success. 
A + R + E4-A= Success 
Ambition -j- Reliability + Efficiency 
+ Abilty = Success 

Feb. 18 

Our Pilgrim is going to be bigger 
and better this year! To make this 
possible, the staff sponsored a dance 
to raise funds for the unique and 
exciting features which the Pilgrim 
will contain. 

March 8 

To-night, in my auditorium, music 
lovers enjoyed an excellent and va- 
ried program by the combined Men's 
and Boys' Glee Clubs. 

April 1 

It's here — Carnival Capers of 1938!! 
Never before has such a throng 
swarmed my cafet — sorry, I mean, 
midway. My sides fairly ache from 
laughing at the dance of the fairies 
and the acrobats. Moreover, I was 
properly mystified by the play and 
edified by the vocal and instrumental 



music. 
April 2 

And they're still coming to see Carni- 
val Capers! I feel very important 
Continued on Page 53 



38 



THE PILGRIM 



"ALUMNI, PLEASE TAKE NOTICE" 

Present and Future we all shall see, 
But to the Past ive hold the key: 
'Twos open house at Plymouth High 
To greet our guests both bold and shy; 
It's over now, and line by line 
We read the guest book each had to sign. 

Mary Bodell from Radcliffe College 
should be congratulated on her prize 
Christmas Story and the subsequent 
appearance of her picture in the Boston 
papers. She is, we think, the first alum- 
ni to earn that distinction. 

Ah, whose signature do you suppose 
is next in our book? That of a Dart- 
mouth Freshman. Yes, it belongs to 
John Ryan — one of the suave young 
men of the class of '37. 

Here, what's this! a modest, chap, 
H. A. You don't suppose it could be 
Howard Anderson, do you? He attends 
Fitchburg College and his sole aim in 
life is to graduate as a teacher of wood- 
working. 

Joseph Brewer is furthering his edu- 
cation at Tabor Academy. His name 
will always bring back memories of his 
part in last year's circus. 

Although Mary Curtin may be in- 
terested in Annapolis, she is working 
hard at Lasell. For proof of that fact, 
she is on the Dean's List. 

It's no overwhelming surprise to find 
Cynthia Drew's name under that of 
Mary. She attends Colby Jr. College, 
and we wonder (or need we) if she ex- 
cels in sports there as she did in good 
old (and new) P. H. S. 

Ana, now we see it all ! Here is the 
name of one Robert Sampson. My, but 
B. U. has changed him. He's as formal 
as Mr. Brewer and quite a ladies' man, 
so we hear. We may well imagine that 
Mr. Sampson escorted Miss Drew to 
our open house. 

The names of the alumni who have 
positions in and about Plymouth have 
filled our next page. First we find Allen 
Morelli who is working at the Plymouth 
Men's Shop, and not far away is Butt- 
ner's where Barbara Armstrong is em- 
ployed. 

William Petrell, we understand, is 
gainfully employed in his father's lum- 
ber business. 

Blanche Borghi en-"light"-ens us by 
stating that she works in the Electric 
Light Office. 

Stanley Addyman has become an am- 
bitious chap these days. He not only 
attends Wentworth in the evening but 
spends his days working in the Puritan 
Mills. 



John Maccaferri/ is advancing very 
rapidly in the business world. When 
there is a need for your shoes to be re- 
paired, remember that Johnny-on-the 
spot Maccaferri will be glad to be of 
service. 

Now we see the signature of the in- 
imitable Ethel Shwom. We shall never 
forget her amusing monologues and her 
weeping act at the Class Banquet. She 
is working in her father's store in North 
Plymouth. 

Although Mary Genovese has not re- 
corded her occupation here, we know, 
(for that's our business) that she is 
employed in Buttner's. 

The next young lady in our book sells 
tickets at the North Plymouth theatre. 
It's Miss Dorine Kirkey, and may we 
add that she has that "box-office ap- 
peal". 

Burdett has attracted many of our 
girls this year, for we see on this page 
that Ruth Flagg, Arlene Neal, and 
Miriam Klasky are enrolled there. The 
following twosome, also enrolled at Bur- 
dett, are, of course, Marjorie Harlow 
and Lois Holmes. 

Another of our alumni intends to be- 
come a good secretary. It's Marjorie 
Tracy whose Alma Mater is Bryant and 
Stratton. 

Bridgewater Normal is represented 
by Miriam Pratt, Alba Martinelli, Kath- 
erine Lahey, and Mary Brigida. We are 
happy to say, at this time, that Shirley 
Dutton, Jeannette Martin, and Dorothy 
Perkins have completed their four-year 
course and will soon be full-fledged 
teachers awaiting their chance to serve 
the youth of America, while Marjorie 
Belcher, who received her A. B. from 
Mt. Holyoke this June, already has her 
opportunity for service in the Departr 
ment of Economics and Sociology at Mt. 
Holyoke. 

We think that "Gabe" Ferrazzi should 
be mentioned here. He was not able to 
sign our guest book because a whole 
continent divides us. He is at San Di- 
ego State Teachers College. 

The final signature is that of last 
year's class president, LeBaron Briggs, 
one of our two alumni enrolled at 
Harvard. 

We close our book with hearts aglow 
At the varied talents the alumni show; 
And at the end of one more year 
To them we give a rousing cheer. 



We hope that you will do unto Our 
Advertisers as they have done by us. 



THE PILGRIM 



39 




THE FACULTY 

Top Row: Mr. Smiley, Miss H. M. Johnson, Miss Carey, Mrs. Garvin, Mr. Shipman, Miss 

Judd, Miss Boucher, Miss Combs, Miss Locklin, Mr. Packard 
Front Row: Mr. Mongan, Miss Wilber, Miss H. C. Johnson, Miss Kelly, Miss Lang, 

Miss Jacques, Miss Rafter, Mrs. Sharkey, Mrs. Raymond, Mr. Bagnall 




STUDENT ACTIVITIES SOCIETY 

First Row: F. Brown, T. Bussolari, R. Beaman, B. Barnes, S. Brewster, R. Tubbs, T. 

Ingenito 
Second Row: B. Paty, A. Barlow, B. Coleman, V. Weston, H, Longhi, F. Kritzmacher, 

S. Cook, V. Kirkey 
Third Row: A. Dutton, F. Soheid, C. Handy, L. Roberge, A. Galvani, D. Harlow, E. 

Bradford, A. Zaniboni 
Fourth Row: J. Govoni, W. Tedeschi, H. Belcher, M. DeCost, E. Mongan, R. Holmes, L. 

Mnrtnn TT Parlnuani Miss .Ta.p.mips Miss Rafter P. O-odfrev. Miss Judd. B. Drew. 



40 



THE PILGRIM 




FOREIGN, 



LANGUAGES 



LATIN DEAD? 

TIT ANY people believe that Latin is a 
■"-■■ dead language, but though it is not 
spoken in any country today, it lives 
in our language, on our monuments, in 
our newspapers, in the works of the 
great. Latin poets, and in our own laws 
and customs. It is estimated that about 
three-fourths of the words of the Eng- 
lish language are derived from the 
Latin. This shows that Latin is a very 
great aid in helping us to know the 
meanings, as well as the spelling, of the 
words in our mother tongue. 

Latin is necessary, not because of the 
language itself, but because of the 
training and development which our 
minds receive from studying such a 
language. We can never really under- 
stand the principles and structure of 
our own English language unless we 
have studied Latin. But, you may ask, 
why does not a Romance language like 
French produce the same effect? Latin 
is the foundation of all the Romance 
languages, and therefore most helpful 
to anyone who wishes to know well his 
own or another Romance language. 

Latin lives in everyday life. For one 
week our class collected all phrases, 
written or spoken, which pertained to 
Latin. "Mea Culpa" and "Ite, missa 
est", as well as references to Rome of 
the Punic Wars, were found in one edi- 
torial. Another was written about 
Horace and contained several Latin 
phrases, among them "Emollit mores, 
nee sinuisse feros." One was entitled 
"Austria Infelix" or "Unlucky Austria." 
The soothsayer's warning to Caesar, 
"Beware the Ides of March" was ex- 
plained in another. This article also 
told how Latin dates are reckoned; that 
is, from the Calends, or first day of the 
month ; from the Nones, which are 
usually the fifth day; or from the Ides, 
which were usually the thirteenth. 




"Referendum," "Tri-Partite Pact," and 
"Status Quo" were found in the head- 
lines of three other newspaper articles. 

It is not uncommon to hear Latin 
phrases given over the radio by some 
of our news commentators, and in our 
own legislative department and in the 
British Parliament such quotations are 
often heard. 

Not long ago, at Harvard, a letter 
written entirely in Latin was received 
from Yugoslavia; asking for the best 
poems and stories written in this coun- 
try on the subject "Mother." Harvard 
officials! declared that they would be 
glad to comply with this request, and 
would write a letter to that effect in 
Latin. 

In our own town we find evidences of 
Latin. The inscription "Plymouth Nov. 
— Anglia Sigillum Societatis" may be 
found on both Pilgrim Hall and the 
Court House, while the memorial on 
the training Green bears these words, 
"Memoria in Aeterna." 

Latin has lived for hundreds of years 
and will live for hundreds of years more 
because it always has been, and always 
will be, necessary for anyone desiring 
a cultural background. 

H. Belcher 



Pluvius : "Bene accidit ut uxores 
nostrae ignorent ubi proxima nocte 
fuerimus." 

Fluvius : "Recti mones. Ceterum, 
ubinam fuimus?" 

Pluvius :; "Ubi essemus, plane ob- 
litus essem !" 



Amicus: "Cur maestus es?" 

Piscator: "Quia ne unum quidem 
piscem cepi." 

Amicus: "Bono eris animo, nam per- 
multl pisces in aqua adhuc manent." 

Piscator: "Certe quidem Ego etiam 
causa sum cur ibi adhuc maneant!" 



THE PILGRIM 



41 



Magister : "Quae pars automobilis 
maxime periculosa est?" 

D i s c i p u 1 u s : "Is, qui automobile 
dirigit " 



A QUOI BON ETUDIER LE 
FRANCAIS 

Pouvez-vous imaginer un soldat sans 
fusil, un cuisinier sans fourneau, ou un 
pianiste sans piano? Une ecole superi- 
eure sans le frangais est aussi absurde. 

On ne doutera pas que l'Amerique 
s'interesse de plus en plus aux nations 
etrangeres. Elle commerce avec ces 
pays, et y conduit beaucoup de negoci- 
ations. La France est une de ces nations. 
Alors, ne sera-t-elle pas d'avantage de 
savoir les coutumes des Francais et 
d'apprendre leur language. 

Le francais est une des plus belles 
langues du monde. Elle est moderne et 
vive. Dans la salle de classe les etudi- 
ants peuvent tenir une conversation 
avec enthousiasme en bon francais. lis 
peuvent lire et comprendre les bons 
livres francais. Peut-etre direz-vous 
que les bons livres sont traduits en 
anglais. C'est vrai. Mais un livre traduit 
perd souvent sa beaute artistique et le 
style litteraire de l'auteur. 

Ne pensez-vous pas un moment que le 
francais soit facile a apprendre. Seule- 
ment avec un travail assidu, les eleves 
peuvent gagner quelque chose qui sera 
utile. Mais, les etudiants qui aiment la 
langue savent que l'etude de francais 
n'est pas toujours decourageante. Us 
veulent bien l'etudier parce qu'ils savent 
aussi que cela vaut la peine. 

Nous voyons que les etudiants qui 
font de bon travail ont une prononci- 
ation plus claire. lis comprennent mieux 
la signification des mots anglais. S'ils 
vont en France, ou meme font la con- 
naissance des Francais, ils pourront s'en 
tirer. 

Beaucoup d'hommes ont passe toute 
leur vie a perfectionner le systeme 
d'education en Amerique. Empecher les 
eleves d'apprendre le francais dans les 
ecoles superieures sera un pas en 
arricre. 

— Mary Cingolani 



MELEZ-VOUS DE VOS AFFAIRES 

A travers les rues occupees de la ville 
un tres grand agent de police menait 
une petite enfant par la main. Une 
femme avec un regard maternel s'est 
arretee devant les deux pour un mo- 
ment. Puis, dans un eclat soudain de 
sympathie elle s'est inclinee sur la fille 
et l'a baisee. 

— Pauvre petite enfant, a-t-elle dit 
tristement. Elle semble si froide et 



affamee. Et je ne crois pas qu'elle ait 
ete lavee pendant toute une semaine. 
Ou l'avez-vous trouvee, monsieur? 

— Je ne l'ai pas trouvee, a repondu 
l'homme en colere. C'est ma propre 
fille. 

— Elva Mulcahy 



LES JOURS DE FETE EN FRANCE 

C'est dupuis quatre ans que je cor- 
responds avec une fille qui demeure au 
midi de la France. De temps en temps 
elle m'a decrit comment les Francais 
celebrent leurs jours de fete. Voici 
quelques rereignements qu'elle m'a 
envoyes. 

Le Noel — En rentrant de la masse de 
minuit, les Francais reveillent; c'est a 
dire, on mange et on boit jusqu'a une 
heure avancee du matin. Dans la nuit 
de 24 ou 25 decembre les petits enfants 
mettent leurs souliers dans les chim- 
inees et le pere Noel leur met des jouets 
et des bonbons dedans. 

Le I avril — C'est le jour ou on se fait 
des farces de toutes sortes et lorsque la 
personne a qui Ton a fait la farce croit 
ce qu'on lui dit. Pour le detromper on 
lui dit: 

— Attrape, poisson d'avril. 

La Toussaint — (c'est a dire, Armis- 
ticeDay) Le jour de la Toussaint en 
France il y a des ceremonies civiles. Les 
autorites vont apporter des couronnes 
et des gerbes de fleurs aux monuments 
aux morts. A Paris c'est le president de 
la Republique qui depose de? couronnes 
et des gerbes sur le tombe du soldat 
inconnu. 

La Fete du Travail — En France le 1 
mai, c'est la fete du travail ; aussi beau- 
coup d'ouvriers font la greve et font 
aussi des manifestations. C'est aussi le 
jour ou on achete des petits bouquets 
qu'on offre a ses amis, et il parait que ce 
petit bouquet porte bonheur. 

Le Mardi-Gras — Dans les villes 
comme Nice il y a de tres belles caval- 
cades. A Nice il y a des batailles de fleurs 
sur terre et sur 1'eau. Une grande cav- 
alcade et toutes sortes de rejouissances 
se trouvent la. 

Ainsi, vous pouvez voir que les Fran- 
cais celebrent presque les meme jours 
de fete que nous, et de presque la 
meme facon. Vous voyez aussi, qu'ils 
s'amusent beaucoup les jours de fete. 
— Florence Canucci 



Le ministre — Pourquoi avez-vous fait 
la reverence dans 1' eglise le dimanche 
passe toutes les fois que le nora de Satan 
etait mentionne? 

L'homme — Eh bien! La politesse ne 
coute rien et — on ne sait jamais. 

— Renato Pedrini 



42 



THE PILGRIM 



LA PREMIERE FOIS 

Une jeune fille, avec son pere, est 
allee pour la premiere fois au cinema. 
Le pere s'est assis au milieu du theatre, 
mais la fille a accompagne quelques-unes 
de ses amies qui sont allees au premier 
rang. Le cinema a commence et tout a 
l'heure a montre un grand feu de foret. 
Tout a coup la petite fille, se levant, a 
couru a son pere. 

— Qu'est-ce qu'il y a, a-t-il dit, est-ce 
que le feu vous a effrayee? 

— Non, je n'en ai pas peur, a repondu 
la petite. 

— Alors, qu'avez-vous? 

— La fumee m'a fait mal aux yeux, a 
repris simplement la fille. 

— Francis Scheid 



Voice des defauts, des "boners," pris 
des lettres recues des filles francaises. 

— I am a brother, he has thirteen 
years. 

— In French schools we does not write 
poems. 

— I think to you but I cannot write 
because I had to bed and I cannot stir. 
Now I am healed. 

— I know which in America the girls 
dance much. Is it right? 

— For me I do not know the dance, I 
make the bicyclette. 



C'etait pendant la classe d'histoire. 
Nous etudions la guerre de 1812 et nous 
parlions du bateau "Constitution," qui 
etait aussi appele "Old Ironsides." Sur 
la mur il y avait une belle peinture de 
ca bateau. 

Un des plus brillants etudiants de 
l'ecoie a leve la main. La professeur a 
dit, Qu'est-ce que vous voulez? 

L'etudiant, avec un air serieux, a dit, 
Cette peinture, represente-elle la "Con- 
stitution?" 

— Oui, a repondu la professeur en 
attendant. 

— Eh bien, si c'est la "Constitution," 
laquelle est "Old Ironsides?" 

— Alfred Pizzotti 



Un dimanche, un Ecossais et sons fils 
marchaient. lis avaient decide de 
marcher a la compagne. 

Apres quelques minutes de silence le 
pere a dit : 

— Mon fils, portez-vous vos meilleurs 
! ouliers? 

— Mais oui, papa, dit le jeune garcon. 
Maman m'a dit de les porter, parce que 
c'est dimanche. 

— Eh bien, dit son pere, prenez des 
pas plus longs ! 

— Carol Handy 




CHEER LEADERS 

V. Kirkey, C. Whiting, P. Brigida, J. Holmes, R. Tubbs 



THE PILGRIM 



43 




fr 



The Pilgrim could do naught but praise 
The Wampatuck's fine book reviews, 
Its clever block prints scattered through, 
Its poetry page and good school news. 



The Hanoverian deserves much praise 
After the passage of ten birthdays, 
Our little critic is hard pressed 
To choose one feature above the rest. 




The Unquity Echo of Milton High 
Quickly caught the Pilgrim's eye; 
Your sports cartoons were cleverly done, 
And your cross-word puzzle — a lot of fun ! 



This is the way the Pilgrim felt 
Before he read your book : 
The Sachem's headings and cover design 
Dispelled his downcast look. 





At the Clipper of Barstable High 

Our little Pilgrim winked his eye, 

Although the pupils he doesn't know much, 

He got a good laugh from "The Personal Touch." 



Abhis, may we extend to you 
Sincerest praise for a fine issue? 
The continued story is something new, 
And "Solv-The-Crim" was clever, too. 





The Pilgrim scanned the Students' Pen, 
At "Penny Pen" he blinked his eyes — 
He found the "Forum" — it was then 
He lost his reserve and showed surprise. 



44 



THE PILGRIM 




CANDI 



1. Time Out 

2. Pretty, Please 

3. There's the Whistle 
Be Prepared 

5. The Dipsy Doodly 

6. The Midway 



THE PILGRIM 



45 




LY YOURS 



7. Recess Tie-ups 

8. Whatcha blowin' about? 
Five Minutes To Go 
Where's That Pigskin? 
Off For a Touchdown 
Watch the Birdie 



9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 



11 



12 



46 



THE PILGRIM 



CLUB NEWS 



THE CAMERA CLUB 

Founded — 1937 Teacher Sponsor Mr. Shipman 

President Vernon Kirkey Vice-President Roland Holmes 

Secretary-Treasurer Virginia Weston Executive Chairman Elizabeth Coleman 

Members 

Stanley Cook 

Jane Holmes 

Ruth Holtz 

Harold Padovani 



Ruth Schilling 
Bradford Smith 
Richard Tubbs 
Charlotte Whiting 



On November 2nd, Mr. Wood gave a 
lecture to the club on photography il- 
lustrated with colored slides. The mem- 
bers have planned hikes to record the 
beauties of nature. They also plan to 
make an album of school photographs 
including candid shots. They sponsored 
the booth "See Yourself as Others See 
You" at the Carnival Capers. The club 
hopes to take part in the statewide ex- 
hibit to be held at the Newton High 



School, on May 9th to 13th inclusive. In 
preparation for this exhibit the mem- 
bers have prepared many interesting 
and unusual snapshots. 

The purpose of the club is to teach 
the student members how to take pic- 
tures correctly and to familiarize each 
pupil with the processes entailed in de- 
veloping the prints. This worthy aim 
is greatly hindered by the lack of de- 
veloping equipment and the need of a 
dark room. 



Pounded — November 1, 1937 

President 

Secretary 



THE RADIO CLUB 

Teacher Sponsor 
. . Leo Roberge Vice-President . . 
Roland Holmes Treasurer 



Mr. Packard 

Amedeo Galvani 

Vernon Kirkey 



Armando Barboza 
Wilfred Cohen 
Fred Diotte 
Louis Dunham 
John Dupuis 



Members 
Henry Fry 
Battista Gallerani 
Donald Govoni 
Joseph P. Govoni 
Francis Kritzmacher 
John Cadoretfte 



Leland Nickerson 
Harold Padovani 
Lillian Sherman 
George Stefani 
Edward Wright 



The club membership was limited to 
those who are seriously interested in ra- 
dio. To aid in getting the equipment 
needed to start work, several radio 
shops in our town gave generously of 
their supply of odd parts. Early in the 
year the members made a field trip to 
W1BTL in North Plymouth. During 
the first months most of their time was 
occupied in learning to send and re- 
ceive Morse Code and in building con- 
siderable equipment for advanced work. 

Their meetings were held on Monday 
and Friday during utility period in 



Room 102, while in the afternoon of the 
same days they met at their workshop 
in the South Street School where they 
transmitted on the five-meter band. For 
this short wave broadcasting they built 
their own power supply unit. 

The goal set by the club is to have 
each student member know how to re- 
pair or build a radio set, and to prepare 
him to get his operating license. A chart 
is kept of each student's progress. It 
is the hope of the club that every mem- 
ber will become acquainted with many 
phases of radio work by the end of the 
current school year. 



Compliments of 

Dutton Motor Car Co. 

115 SANDWICH ST. 

OLDSMOBILE 
CADILLAC LA SALLE 

Tel. 1500-W 



SALES 



SERVICE 



I 



THE PILGRIM 



47 



Founded 1929 
President 



HONOR SOCIETY 

Teacher Sponsor 

Francis Scheid Vice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer Barbara Patfy 



Miss Carey 

Amedeo Galvani 



Members 



Iride Albertini 
Helen Belcher 
Florence Canucci 
Mary Cingolani 
Carol Handy 
m Jeanette Hatton 

Roland Holmes 
Alice Riley 
Betty Studley 
John Tavernelli 

Since its inauguration the Honor 
Society has had charge of many assem- 
blies of various kinds. At one time it 
held a "What Next?" night at which 
graduates and teachers were asked to 
speak on different colleges and other 
institutions of learning. Then it organ- 
ized a group of cheer leaders and se- 
cured some new cheers through a con- 
test which each home room entered. It 
was the Honor Society which organized 
the present Student Activities Society. 
For several years the members of this 
group have had charge of "Senior Get 
Togethers," dancing classes for seniors. 
It drew up a point system, a few years 
ago, to aid the teachers in judging 
leadership and service when selecting 
members for the Society. Last year it 



Leo Roberge 
William Tedeschi 
Brooks Barnes 
Frances Brown 
Mary Elizabeth Edes 
Eleanor Fascioli 
Jane Holmes 
Emily McEwen 
Nahum Morse 
Charlotte Whiting 

made arrangements for an Alumni 
Day. In the near future the society 
plans to organize an alumni association 
of all its members who have graduated. 
If a teacher is absent, it is the duty of 
some member of this society to act as 
monitor in her room. This year the 
members decided to take care of all the 
stage properties and costumes which 
the high school possesses. 

The purpose of the club is to recog- 
nize scholarship and service to the 
school, and to develop character and 
leadership. 



On being asked to paraphrase the 
sentence, "He was bent on seeing her," 
a pupil wrote, "The sight of her doubled 
him up." 




NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 

Reading from left to right: A. Riley. C. Handy, J. Hatton, B. Studley, M. Cingolani, F. 
Canucci, R. Holmes, J. Tavernelli, B. Paty, L. Roberge, W. Tedeschi, Mr. Shipman, 
F. Scheid, A. Galvani, H. Belcher, I. Albertini, Miss Carey, N. Morse, E. McEwen, 
M. E. Edes, J. Holmes, E. Fascioli, B. Barnes, C. Whiting, F. Brown 



48 THE PILGRIM 

THE 4-H CLUB 

Pounded— March 4, 1935 Teacher Sponsor Mr. Smiley 

President Roland Holmes Vice-President Talbot Cobb 

Secretary Harold Padovani Treasurer Francis Scheid 

Members 

Robert Cadorette Vernon Kirkey 

John Cadorette Willard Lavoie 

Edmund Costa Paul Sampson 
William Ide 

The members are learning to identi- The 4-H Club has taken part in many 
fy trees, birds, and flowers. They have out-of-town events. In February of the 
studied surveying and map making, current year, members attended a re- 
and built several types of bird house. union of older members in Hanover, at 
From time to time the club has speak- which all enjoyed dancing and refresh- 
ers who entertain and instruct with mo- ments. They went to Whitman on 
tion pictures and colored slides. Every March 2, to attend an illustrated lecture 
year two members are chosen from the in colors on "Touring the United 
club to attend the annual meeting of the States." 

State 4-H Conservation Camp, held in The purpose of the club is to acquaint 

different districts of Massachusetts. the students with forest conservation, 

The camp is for one week, in which tree surgery, wild life, surveying, an:l 

time those attending are taught fores- map making. During the last three 

try, conservation, and nature by ex- years the club has successfully carried 

perts in those fields. on a tent caterpillar campaign. 




INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE CLUB 

First Row: F. Brown. O. Montali, H. Guidetti. R. Tmbbs (Pres.), M. Baker (Sec), R. 
Lanman (V. P.), A. Bittinger. M. Ruggiero. B. Pizzotti, C. Ottino 

Second Row: J. Beaver, A. Beaman, R. Holtz, A. Pederzani, M. Pascoe, G. Morelli, L. 
Coggeshall, L. Rovatti, M. Roncarati 

Third Row: R. Silva, Miss Carey, C. Leonardi, E. DeCost, A. Riley, S. Goldsmith, F. 
Mulcahy, A. Govi, E. Fascioli, P. Reinhardt, R. Grant 

Fourth Row: F. Canucci, L. Hall, A. Riley, E. Mulcahy, B. Barnes, I. Murphy, B. Cog- 
geshall, F. Ryan 

Fifth Row: B. Kritzmacher, P. Douglas, B. Peterson, C. Raymond, A. Addyman, L. 
Longinotti, B. Smith, P. Douglas 

Sixth Row: E. McEwen, L. Morton, E. Mongan, J. Brewer 



THK PILGRIM 



49 



INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE CLUB 



Founded— 1932 
President 



Richard Tubbs 

Secretary-Treasurer 



Teacher Sponsor 

Vice-President 

Madeline Baker 



Miss Carey 

Richard Lanman 



Anne Beaman 
Joan Beever 



Program Committee 



Frances Brown 
Mary Edes 



Members 



Constance Addyman 
Ann Bittinger 
Florence Canucci 
Doris Chadwick 
Priscilla Douglass 
Alice Govi 
Lillian Hall 
Ruth Holtz 
Laura MacLean 
Edgar Mongan 
Elva Mulcahy 
Claire Ot'tino 
Barbara Peterson 
Charlotte Raymond 
Alice Riley 
Mickalena Ruggiero 
Richard Silva 



Iride Albertini 
John Brewer 
Barbara Coggeshall 
Edith DeCost 
Eleanor Fascioli 
Rosemonde Grant 
Barbara Harlow 
Barbara Kritzmacher 
Iole Marvelli 
Gloria Morelli 
Ita Murphy 
Marilyn Pascoe 
Bruna Pizzotti 
Phyllis Reinhardt 
Margaret Roncarati 
Frances Ryan 
Leslie B. Smith 
Betty Studley 



Brooks Barnes 
John Cadorette 
Lillian Coggeshall 
Paul Douglas 
Shirley Goldsmith 
Eleanor Hall 
Jessie Hollis 
Catherine Leonardi 
Emily McEwen 
Lewis Morton, Jr. 
Jean Murray 
Alberta Pederzani 
Robert Pratt 
Rital Riedel 
Lois Rovatti 
Eunice Santos 
Annie Stein 



The International Correspondence 
Club has enjoyed many lectures among 
which were: "Honolulu," Miss Brown; 
"World Tour," Mrs. Hirsen; "Japan," 
Mrs. Starr; "Sweden," Miss Burgess; 
"England," Mr. Beever; "Palestine," 
Mrs. FYiedman; "Italy," Miss Peder- 
zani ; and "Armistice Day in France," 
Mr. Carr. Mrs. Richter gave the club a 
piano concert playing music of Grieg, 
Debussy, Rachmaninoff, and Mac- 
Dowell. 

The members presented an Armistice 
Dav Assembly on November 11 last, 
entitled, "Return," by Dorothy C. Wil- 
son with a cast of: Francis Scheid, Leo 
Roberge, Mary Elizabeth Edes, Richard 
Silva, and Richard Tubbs. On October 
28, 1937, the club sponsored a costume 



dance which was very successful, since 
the greater part of the dancers entered 
into the spirit of the affair and appeared 
in costume. The proceeds of this dance 
were to pay for bringing Dr. Knudsen 
of Boston to the school to give a lecture 
when he gets back from abroad. 

The purpose of the club is to create 
world friendship. It has as its motto, 
"Build friendships, not warships." The 
members carry on correspondence with 
many foreign countries, the most im- 
portant being with England, France, 
Italy, Japan, and Sweden ; while South 
Africa, Malay, Honolulu, the East In- 
dies, and Egypt are among the most 
unusual. They also correspond with 
Australia, New Zealand, Norway, Bra- 
zil, and the Netherlands. 




The above cut won first prise in the linoleum 
cut contest sponsored by "The Pilgrim." It is 
the icork of Charlotte Whiting '39. 



FAR FROM THE MADDING WORK 

(Apologies to Nixon Waterman) 
It seems to me I'd like to go 
Where bells don't ring, nor whistles blow. 
No rush from bed as clocks resound, 
Boy! I'd have silence all around. 

Not all alone, but with the rest 
Of friends who like the country best, 
Worn out from education's force, 
For untouched books, no sad remorse. 

Mayhap the cricket's song will soothe, 
Or birds' sweet tunes our hearts will move, 
Or just such sounds to bring us sleep, 
No harsh alarm to make us leap. 

Sometimes it seems to me I must 
Just quit the city's din and dust. 
And take you where the sky is blue — 
Say, now, how does that seem to you? 

Constance Kellen '38 



50 



THE PILGRIM 



PLYMOUTH HOOP NEWS 

A ND another year rolls by. No more 
■^*- basketball, no more cheering, no 
more dancing, and no more excuse to 
buy lollypops. The blue and white suits 
are cleaned and packed away in moth- 
balls. 

Last year's basketball is but a vague 
remembrance to some of us, but there 
are many who'll never forget. They will 
always remember the night when we 
outscored Bridgewater in the Memorial 
Hall, when we played in Middleboro, 
and when we beat East Bridgewater on 
their own floor. 

We must admit that our team was 
not outstanding this year, but we must 
also state that the competition this year 
was above average. We are thinking of 
such talented players as Hickey at Ab- 
ington, Pratt at Bridgewater, Allen and 
McCarthy at Weymouth, Tedeschi at 
Rockland, and Maki at Barnstable. 
There you have the material for an out- 
standing basketball team. 

Of course we have James, of whom 
we are proud, but a man of medium 
height does not and can not win a game 
by himself. 

This year we are fortunate in losing 
only two players from our starting line- 



up ; Wayne Allen, a guard, and Leo Ro- 
berge, our center. But their places 
should be efficiently filled by some of 
the very promising sophomores who 
have already seen service on the vars- 
ity. We are also sorry to lose Govoni 
and Regini through graduation. Our 
second team will feel the loss of Brigida 
and Bastoni. 

Next season we are looking forward 
to a good scoring team with Garuti and 
James at the forward positions and 
Rogers at center. These three have ob- 
tained much needed experience in the 
past year. We expect our goal to be 
well defended by Freeman and Farina, 
two promising junior guards. 

The source of greatest stimulation to 
the spirits of the team at every game 
last year was the support of the student 
body. The attendance at the games an 1 
the enthusiastic cheering were most 
encouraging. 

Mr. Gilbert C. Garland replaced Mr. 
Clark "Click" Ingraham this year as 
coach of our basketball team. We all 
agree that he has done a fine job of 
coaching, considering the inexperienced 
material with which he had to work. 
He was assisted by Mr. Knowlton who 
helped to drill the squad in practice ses- 
sions. 




BOYS' BASKETBALL 

First Row: W. Allen, G. Freeman, B. James, W. Garuti, M. Regini 

Second Row: Mr. Garland, G. Randall, H. Rogers, L. Roberge, D. Govoni, J. Farina, 
W. Cohen 



THE PILGRIM 



51 




FOOTBALL SQUAD 

First Row: B. James, M. Brewst'er, G. Pearson, E. Leonardi, S. Secondo, W. Allen, L. 

Roberge, J. Caramello, R. Silva, J. Farina, L. Ingenito 
Second Row: Mr. Knowlton, D. Furtado, T. Prentice, H. Darsch, W. Peck, E. Wright, H. 

Malaguti, A. Babini, J. Darsch, A. Brigida, G. Freeman, S. Brewst'er, Mr. Romano 
Third Row: E. Costa, C. Krim, S. Shwom, W. Holmes, J. Ohristani, M. Regini, J. Costa, 

A. Galvani, D. McDonald, J. Govoni, G. Tavares 
Fourth Row: A. Zaniboni, J. Cavacco, J. Torres, G. St. George, T. Diotte, G. Sampson, 

W. Ide, J. Iodice, H. Frim, G. Cavicchi 




Compliments of 

SUBBIE'S SERVICE STATION 

KINGSTON, MASS. 

Tel. Kingston 222 



.,—.„_„_,,_„._,,.— .„.—„_„._„.—.„_,,_„_„_, ,_„_„_„_„_„_„_„_ ,,—„—„— „_„—.„—. ,—„—.,_„_ „— , i 



52 



THE PILGRIM 



"GOOD-BYE, VARSITY" 

"TTELLO, coach," chorused several 
-Tl senior boys as they walked slowly 
into Mr. Knowlton's office at one end of 
the boys' locker room. 

Smiling cheerfully, the coach forgot 
for the moment the task of storing 
away the baseball uniforms for the 
summer months, and greeted each boy 
by name as he entered the room. 

"What seems to be the trouble here?" 
asked Mr. Knowlton. "Why all the sad 
looks on your faces? Aren't you glad 
you're going to graduate?" 

It was the last day of school and all 
the graduating football players had 
gathered here for the last time. They 
had come to get one more look at the 
place where they had dressed so many 
times in preparation for a football 
game, and to bid farewell to their coach 
whom they had come to respect and ad- 
mire. 

"Nothing, especially," replied Allen, 
our captain and right guard, "only we 
were talking of our last season's record 
and we rather regret the standing we 
made." 

"Nonsense, boys, I'm proud of the 
way you played. I'll always remember 
the pep and fight you showed at the 
Dedham game. Although the average 
weight of our opponents was much 
higher than ours, they had to struggle 
for every gain they made. The game I 
regret was the one played in Bridgewa- 
ter when we lost a twelve-point lead and 
subsequently the game." 

"I'll never forget the Rockland game," 
said Wright, and the smile on Martin 
Brewster's face showed that he agreed. 
"How we sang and cheered all the way 
home on the bus!" 

"I miss Leonardi's voice around here 
since he left school," remarked Mr. 
Knowlton. "He was always arguing 
with Roberge as to which nationality 
was superior, Italian or French," and 
everyone laughed. 

"Speaking of missing people, it was 
too bad Galvani's trick knees had to 
start troubling him in the middle of the 
season. His weight and speed might 
have helped very much in the Whitman, 
Weymouth, and Saugus games," sighed 
Regini. 

Pearson, never a garrulous person, 
was meditating upon the defeats at 
Hingham, Abington, and Middleboro. 

After a little more conversation the 
boys left the locker room after mentally 
saying goodbye to everything that it 



represented, and went their respective 
ways. Every one of them would like 
nothing better than to be able to return 
to school next year to play again. Al- 
though the team had not won many 
games, yet they had found something 
here worth much more to them than vic- 
tories. They had learned to play the 
game for the joy of the physical contact 
which the sport demands, and not for 
the sole purpose of winning every game. 
Parsons, Peck, and Joseph P. Govoni 
were also an asset to the varsity. The 
other graduating senior players are 
Darsch, S. Brewster, Malaguti, and 
Griffin. 



CHEER UP, BOYS 

Many games you've lost, boys, 
You played them clean and fast; 

Beaten at the end, boys, 
Tough! But let it pass. 

Not the losing counts, boys, 

When you've played them fair; 

Those who cheat in games, boys, 
Are the ones who need to care. 

So it is in life, boys, 

Just make this your plan : 

Grit your teeth, then smile, boys, 
Take it like a man. 

L. Roberge '38 



WHEN SILENCE COMES 

Sometimes, when silence spreads her wings, 

Like silver on the heavy air, 
I think of unessential things — 

Of swaying trees — grotesque and bare, 
And buterflies whose broken wings 

Lie helpless in a garden path. 
Of gorgeous sunsets — blazing red, 

A dance that matched some fragile dream; 
And through this haze, your lifted head. 

And then a haunting tune; and nights 
To which the scent of roses clings. 

It's only when the silence comes, 
I think of unessential things. 

Ella Vitti '39 



QUICK, HENRY, THE FLIT 

There are some pests that we would like 
Immensely to exterminate; 
For none of us appreciates 
The ones, who when the hero's fate 
Hangs in the scales, communicate 
How the play will terminate. 

There are some pests that we would like 
Immensely to exterminate. 

Richard H. Tubbs '39 



Some men would look more spic if 
they had less span. 



"Pop! I need an encyclopedia for 
school." 

"Encyclopedia! Nothing doing. You 
can walk to school like I did." 



THE P1LGR.M 



53 



WE WANT A BASKET! 

rpHE basketball teams were not par- 
■*• ticularly successful this past season, 
very probably because the whole of the 
first team graduated last year and a 
new one had to be organized. It con- 
sisted of four juniors and two sopho- 
mores, which indicates that next year's 
team should give a fine account of itself. 

We played only seven games of which 
we won three and lost the rest. The 
second team played four games, won 
two, tied one, and lost one. Our oppon- 
ents this season were Middleboro, Whit- 
man, East Bridgewater, and, as usual, 
the alumnae. 

This year Mrs. Garvin held inter- 
class games. The Seniors lost to the 
Sophomores, the Junior Firsts defeated 
the Junior Seconds, the Junior Seconds 
were, in turn, defeated by the Seniors, 
and the winners were the Junior Firsts, 
who had defeated the Sophomores. 

The varsity consisted of four of the 
six on the Junior first team and two 
Sophomores: Jane Holmes, Betsy Drew, 
and Euphemia Gascoyne, forwards ; 
Lois Rovatti, Virginia Weston, and Til- 
lie Bussolari, guards. 



IN A DESERTED SCHOOLHOUSE 

Echoes — as I pulled wide the heavy door 

And stepped inside. 
Echoes — of myriads of youthful voices, 

Heard no more. 
When footsteps fall on the sagging stairs 

Where phantoms glide, 
Creaks like the crackle of distant thunder 

Cross the floor. 

Initialled walls tell much of adolescent loves 

— Now grown old, 
Rain-streaked windows, oft sought by wandering 
eyes 

In dreams — now gone. 
Where once the warmth of youth gave heat 

Here dwells Cold: 
Who knows what dreams have now come true 
That here were born? 

Barbara Paty '38 



Excerpts from the Diary of P. H. S. 

Continued from Page 37 

and very proud to offer my conveni- 
ences to such appreciative people. 
In the not too distant future I hope 
I shall again witness such a splendid 
performance, demonstrating the fine 
, spirit of cooperation between teachers 
and the student body ! 
April 3 

A day of rest ! ! Thank goodness ! 



BULLY! 

THE hockey team was entirely suc- 
cessful this year in view of the fact 
that it was composed of one sophomore, 
seven juniors, and only three seniors. 
The first team played seven games, won 
two, tied two, and lost three while the 
second team won three games, tied two, 
and lost one. 

Probably the most exciting game of 
the season was in Scituate. The oppos- 
ing team had made two points in the 
first half, and we were trying to defeat 
them in the pouring rain, but we were 
unable to score ourselves. 

Mrs. Garvin continued, as usual, her 
excellent coaching, and was very much 
pleased to find that more girls came out 
for hockey this season than ever before. 

Special credit goes this year to Cap- 
tain Carol Handy, L. W. ; Evon Lee, 
R. F. B. ; and Marion Lahey, Goalkeep- 
er; for their four years of consistent 
practice. Others on the team were: 
Tillie Bussolari, R. W. ; Lois Rovatti, 
R. I. ; Charlotte Whiting, C. F. ; Barbara 
Harlow, L. I.; Betsy Drew, R. H.; Jane 
Holmes, C. H.; Antonette Rossetti, L. 
H. ; and Brooks Barnes, L. F. B. 

Next year we hope that we may re- 
ward Mrs. Garvin's patience and coop- 
eration by having an undefeated team. 



MAGIC 

Out of the miles of blackness — 
Out of the starless night — 
Across the darkened skyline 
Her soul's eyes saw no light. 

Out of the deepening stillness — 
Out of the mystic air — 
Out of her inward torment 
She heard music soft and rare. 

Into her restless spirit — 
Into her turbulent brain — 
Came a sudden, soothing calmness 
Like a sweet and gentle rain. 

Shirley Goldsmith '39 



Aeneas wandered far and wide, 
Took himself for quite a ride, 
Including me, for still I doubt 
What the deuce it's all about. 

C. Kellen 



There once was a man named Aeneas, 
Who was taking the place of Sychaeus, 
But he soon tired of Dido 
Who called him her Fido 
And wandered the rest of his years. 

R. Pedrini 




GIRLS' HOCKEY 

First Row: L. Rovatti, T. Bussolari, J. Holmes, B. Drew, M. Lahey, C. Handy, E. Lee, B. 

Harlow, B. Barnes, C. Whiting, A. Rossetlti 
Second Row: C. Addyman, E. Mullany, I. Murphy, B. Johnson, B. Coleman, M. Ruggiero, 

V. Sampson. D. Jesse, A. Barlow 
Third Row: V. Weston, V. Young, E. Dupuis, A. Holmes, P. Gascoyne, A. Robrege 
Fourth Row: V. Vinton, E. Vitti. Coach Garvin. E. McEwen. J. Holmes. H. Belcher 




GIRLS' BASKETBALL 

First Row: P. Gascoyne, B. Drew, J. Holmes, T. Bussolari, V. Weston, L. Rovatti 
Second Row: C. Whiting, B. Studley, B. Coleman, M. Lahey, A. Beaman, A. Stein 
Third Row: M. Fernandes, I. Murphy, E. McEwen, Mrs. Garvin, B. Kritzmacher, B. 
Barnes, V. Sampson 



THE PILGRIM 



55 




Algy met a bear. 
The bear was bulgy. 
The bulge was Algy. 



that 



Not Found in a Dictionary 
Banana Peel — Food article 
brings the weight down 

Etc. — Sign used to make others be- 
lieve you know more than you do 

Horrible Example — Any Mathematics 
problem 

Rubber Goods — Opera glasses, tele- 
scopes 

Tangerine — A loose-leaf orange 
Vacuum — Nothing shut up in a box 



"Here comes the parade! Where's 
Auntie?" 

"She's upstairs waving her hair." 
"Goodness, can't we afford a flag?" 



All Line Up, Please 
The following message was flashed 
upon the screen of a popular cinema : 
"A five-dollar bill has been found in the 
aisle. Will the owner please form a 
queue outside the box office tomorrow 
night?" — Montreal Star 



— His conversation puts a terrific 
strain on the eyebrows. 



— Road maps tell a motorist every- 
thing he wants to know except how to 
fold them up again. 



— Slam of the month : Knitting gives 
women something to think about while 
they are talking. 



— Synonym: A word used when you 
can't find the word you want. 



— The good old days — when only One 
man in Europe thought he was Napol- 
eon. 

— The difference between the right 
word and the almost right word is the 
difference between lightning and the 
lightning bug. — Mark Twain 

— When I think of then, I could grind 
my teeth to powder and blow them 
through my nose. — Alice Roosevelt 
Longivorth 



Quite Clear 
Farmer (on telephone to police) — A 
blue motor car passed here, killed a cow, 
containing four gentlemen and two 
greyhounds, one of which was a clergy- 
man with no license. — Pathfinder 



Teacher — "Johnny, give me the prin- 
cipal parts of the verb swim." 
Johnny — "Swim, swam, swum." 
Teacher — "Do the same with dim." 
Johnny — "Dim — aw, don't ask me, 
teacher." 



Jane: What's this I hear about your 
going to the movies with your boarder? 
Mary : Oh, that's only a roomer. 



A man committed suicide and left a 
note explaining: To the authorities — 
I was cleaning the gun when it went off 
accidentally. 



Hiccough — a spasmodic inspiration 
with a closure of the glottis, producing 
a characteristic sound. 



In Greece, a man took some clothes to a 

tailor. 
Said the tailor, "Ah, my good friend, 

Euripedes." 
Said the customer. "Ah, my good friend, 

Eumendies." 



Heads of Indian tribes are called 
chiefs, and their daughters are called 
Mischiefs. 

Conductor — (to his orchestra) : You 
fellows have only one thing to learn. 
The white part is the paper, and the 
black part is the music. 

A passive verb is one in which the 
subject is the sufferer; such as, "He 
married her." 



Contralto is a low kind of music sung 
only by ladies. 



— "The idea of that bus-driver! He 
glared at me as if I hadn't paid any 
fare." 

—"And what did you do?" 

— "I just glared at him — as if I had!" 



56 



THE PILGRIM 



"How did the jokes in The Pilgrim 
get across?" 

"On the Mayflower." 



Mr. White: Say, mind my car while 
I run into the store, will you? 

Congressman Watson : Sir, I am a 
congressman. 

Mr. White : That's all right. I trust 
you. 



"Is your wife having any success 
driving a car?" 

"Well, the road is beginning to turn 
when she does." 



Political candidates : We need gov- 
ernment reform, police reform, social 
reform, and what I need is — 

Voice from the rear: Chloroform! 



Teacher : You should have been here 
at nine o'clock, Harold. 

Harold: Why, what happened? 



A woman is a person who can hurry 
through a drug store aisle eighteen 
inches wide without brushing against 
the piled-up tinware, and then drive 
home and still knock off one of the doors 
of a twelve-foot garage. 



Notice on an office door in an Ala- 
bama township: "Back in an hour. 
Gone to lynch." 



"Did they take an X-ray photo of 
your wife's jaw at the hospital?" 

"Yes, but all they could get was a 
moving picture." 



Policeman : How did the accident 
happen? 

Motorist: My wife fell asleep in the 
back seat. 



Uncle Hink and Aunt Puney went out 
to the beach for the summer, and the 
first night Aunt Puney sat and looked at 
the lighthouse. It was one of those 
lighthouses that blink off and on every 
thirty seconds. At the end of fifteen 
minutes, Aunt Puney said, "Well, Hink, 
I've learned my lesson in patience. The 
wind has blown that light out thirty 
times now, and that fella just keeps 
lighting it again." 



A certain chemistry student (chem. 
7) would have received A in his course 
on explosives if he hadn't blown up at 
the last moment. 



"Dad sent me for a piece of rope like 

this." 

"How much does he want?" 

"Oh, just enough to reach from the 

cow to the fence." 



Customers : I don't want those crack- 
ers. Someone told me the rats ran all 
over them. 

Grocer: That isn't true because the 
cat sleeps in the box every night. 



Judge : Why did you steal that 
$500,000? 

Accused : I was hungry. 



'What are you writing?" 

'A joke." 

'Well, give her my regards." 



Well-dressed man, cigar in hand, 
falling through the air from an air- 
plane : "Gad, that wasn't the washroom 
after all !" 



Said the raindrop to the particle of 
dust: "This settles you; your name is 
mud." 



The doctor was visiting Rastus' 
wife to deliver her twelfth offspring. 
While riding with Rastus on the way to 
his house, he saw a duck in the road. 

Doctor: Whose duck is that? 

Rastus : Dat ain't no duck. Da's a 
stork wid his legs wore off. 



For one-armed drivers — You can't 
pay attention to your brakes when your 
mind is on your clutch. 



Advice to motorists — Just because 
you see its tracks is no sign a train has 
just passed. 



A country feller used to do some 
trucking with a dray, and once a city 
feller hired him. When the country 
feller told him the charge would be 
$1.80, the city feller asked him to make 
out a bill for him. The farmer went 
home, and worked for hours trying to 
do so. Suddenly he said to his wife : "I 
think I got it. Three comes and three 
goes at thirty cents a went — $1.80. 



Professor: How did it happen that 
an English Prince, the son of an Eng- 
lish King, was born on Welsh soil?" 

Day-dreaming pupil : Well, er-why, 
errr, you see, Professor, his mother was 
there." 



THE PILGRIM 



57 




photography 



1 he individual grad- 
uation portraits in the 
Pilgrim mark the at' 
tainments of our first 
year in Plymouth. 



the chase studio 




58 



THE PILGRIM 



l-E-S BETTER SIGHT LAMPS 



I 




Light up and live! It is a scientific fact that good 
lighting actually aids physical and mental well-being. 
That is why the abundant, glareless lighting of I.E.S. 
Better Sight Lamps permits you to relax and enjoy 
your book or your card game. 




Come in and see how they differ from ordinary lamps. 
See the translucent bowl that softens and diffuses 
the light, preventing glare from shiny surfaces. See 
why they give several times as much light as ordinary 
lamps, and give useful light over a wider area. See how 
they combine graceful beauty with sight-saving lighting. 




Six-way model uses 1 00-200-300 
watt MAZDA lamp. Note trans- 
lucent reflector common to ol 
I. E. S. Better Sight Lamps. 



Plymouth County Electric Co- 

"At Your Service" 
Telephone 1300 



Plymouth j 



THE PILGRIM 



59 



76th year 



Degree courses in Business Administration, 
Accountancy and Finance, Secretarial Science 
and Commercial Teacher-Training (four 
years). Also shorter diploma Secretarial courses. 

Free Placement Service. Bryant gradu- 
ates are in demand for responsible posi- 
tions. 

Enrollment limited. Early registration is 
advisable. You are invited to visit the College 
and inspect the campus and the College-super- 
vised dormitories. Catalog and View Book 
mailed free. Address, Director of Admissions: 




-»?§•"•». * ; 



BRYANT COLLEGE 

Hope and Benevolent Streets and Young Orchard Avenue 

PROVIDENCE, R. I. 



BURDETT COLLEGE 



Courses for ™" 1 ^™ 1 

Young Men and Women 

Business Administration-Accounting 
(Pace), Secretarial, Shorthand, Type- 
writing, Business, and Finishing courses. 

One and Two-Year Programs. Previous 

commercial training not required for 

entrance. Leading colleges represented 

in attendance. Students from different 

states. 

Write or telephone for 
Day or Evening Catalog 



\J \Jtk uea 

BEGINS IN 
SEPTEMBER 



56 STUART STREET, BOSTON 




en 



BUSINESS TRAINING 

needed to 

MAKE THE RIGHT START 

MOVE STEADILY FORWARD 

ACHIEVE SUCCESS 

(with a Degree Plan for those 
who wish it) 

and in addition 

VOCATIONAL COUNSEL 
AND PLACEMENT 
_ SERVICE 



Telephone HANcock 6300 



60 



THE PILGRIM 



f i—n-i i -M i M.,,., 













BAILEY MOTOR SALES, INC. 

Tel. 1090 
1 1 4 SANDWICH STREET PLYMOUTH, MASS. 

Buick and Pontiac Sales and Service 
G.M.C. Truck Sales and Service 

A reliable place to trade . . . One of the best equipped Service Station^ 

in this vicinity . . . 24-hour service , . . Open day and night . . . 

Agents for Exide Batteries and United States Tires. 

DON'T FORGET — All of our REPAIR WORK is GUARANTEED 

A fine selection of 

USED CARS AND TRUCKS 

to choose from at all times. 



THE PILGRIM 61 



JOHN E. JORDAN CO. 

Your Hardware Store for 113 Years 

PAINTS, HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES 

PLUMBING, HEATING; SHEET METAL WORK 

1 MAIN STREET, PLYMOUTH 
Tel. 283 



IT HAS BEEN OUR GREAT PLEASURE TO SERVE 

BOTH THE HIGH AND JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS 

DURING THE SCHOOL YEARS FROM 1929 TO 1938 



LAHEY'S 

High Quality Ice Cream 



STYLE Plus QUALITY 

Two Very Important Words in Our 
NEW LINE OF SPORT CLOTHES FOR SUMMER 

WASH SLACKS — SPORT SHIRTS — 

SWEATERS — NOVELTY HOSE 

In Our New Style Line You Will Find Something Different 

Agents for BOSTONIAN SHOES 

MORSE & SHERMAN 

WM. J. SHARKEY 

COURT STREET PLYMOUTH 

GRADUATION 
SENIORS ..... 

You'll want to look your best when you step up to receive your diploma, 
at that great event — Graduation. 

WE HAVE THE SUITS, TIES, SHIRTS, AND SHOES THAT WILL GIVE YOU THE 

WELL-DRESSED APPEARANCE THAT YOU DESIRE. VISIT OUR STORE 

AND LET US ASSIST YOU IN MAKING YOUR SELECTIONS 

"The New Modern" 

PURITAN CLOTHING COMPANY 

"Home of Dependability" 
56 MAIN STREET TeL 730-731 PLYMOUTH 



62 



THE PILGRIM 



Make your next automobile investment the 
soundest money can buy 



A NEW 



FORD 



V-8 



Pay for it through the 

UNIVERSAL CREDIT COMPANY 

at the rate of 

$ 25 

(after usual, low down payment . . . your PRESENT car will 



A 
MONTH 



probably cover that) 
We are offering this finance plan, as well as other plans figured at the rate 
of Vz of 1% (6% for 12 months) on the original unpaid 
balance and insurance. 

Get complete details and a ride in a New Ford V-8 by calling 

PLYMOUTH MOTOR SALES 

Authorized Ford Sales and Service 
181 COURT ST. Tel. 1247-W PLYMOUTH 



Wilfred Training; 
the practical course 
in Beauty Culture 

%V /"ILFRED training in Beauty Culture 

* ' assures success in this interesting, well 
paying profession. Famous hairdressers in- 
dorse and recommend Wilfred training be- 
cause: Sound, proven principles are correctly 
interpreted and applied by our master- 
instructors. Spacious modern classrooms are 
thoroughly equipped for fundamental and 
practical training in every phase of Beauty 
Culture. Write for free illustrated Booklet 
E 24. 

Wilfred Academy occupies the entire 
building at 492 Boylston Street, Boston. 
No other school in New England is as large 
as Boston Wilfred Academy. Visit us at 
your convenience. We will be glad to show 




you our classes in session. Day and evening 
courses. 



WILFRED ACADEMY 

of Hair and Beauty Culture 
492 BOYLSTON STREET Kenmore7286 BOSTON, MASS. 



THE PILGRIM 63 



BORZAN BEAUTY SALON 

Permanents $3.50 

End Permanents $2.50 

Hair Cuts, Finger Waves, Manicure, Eyebrows and Hair Trimming 

Priced at 35c 

MISSES BORSARI AND ZANDI 
20 North Spooner Street NORTH PLYMOUTH 

Call MISS ZANDI 



Compliments of 

MITCHELL - THOMAS CO., Inc. 

PLYMOUTH'S 

LEADING FURNITURE STORE 

Opposite Pilgrim Hall 



Compliments of 



CAPPANNARI BROS. 



WHITNEY SHIRTS MALLORY HATS 

PLYMOUTH MEN'S SHOP 

WM. CAVICCHI, Prop. 

18 Main Street Tel. 341 

LOW OVERHEAD — REASONABLE PRICES 

See Our Special Offer On Suits For Graduates 

CONGRESS SPORTSWEAR CHARACTER CLOTHES 



64 THE PILGRIM 



Best Wishes for Success 
After Graduation 



from. 



BUTTNER'S 



FOR THE GRADUATION GIFT 

Give a Fine Watch or Ring 

We carry a complete line of Nationally Advertised Watches 
Bulova, Benrus, Elgin, Gruen, Hamilton, Waltham and Longines 

Friendship and Birthstone Rings ; Sheaffer Pen and Pencil Sets ; Umbrellas ; 

Overnight Cases; Tie and Collar Sets; Bill Folds; 

Toilet Sets, 3 pieces to 20 

PAY AS LITTLE AS FIFTY CENTS A WEEK 



\ / S ^S*^** *' Visit Our 

OPTICAL DEPARTMENT 



'^^^^oM^or 



Eyes Examined -- Glasses Fitted 

I)K. E. P. JEWETT. ReK. Optometrist 
in Charge 



THE PILGRIM 



65 



> '— ■ '— ■ ■— » '— ■ "— >' '— ■ '— ■ '— ■ '— ' '— ' '— ■ •— ■ •— •' '— ■ '— ■ '— - '— ■ '— • '— ■ '— ■ — - ■— ■• '— ■ — •"— < '— ■ '— ■ '— ■ '■—• — ■ '— ■ ■— "— ■ 



PUZZLED 

by Gift 
Problems? 

Take a TIP . . . Take a TRIP to 




BURBANK'S, INC. 



19-21 Court St., 



PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



THE NATION'S BIRTHPLACE 



Compliments of 



KAY'S CUT-RATE 

23 MAIN STREET 

Next to First National Market 



PATENT MEDICINES, COSMETICS 

LOWEST PRICES IN TOWN 



Compliments of 


Compliments of 


LEONORE'S BEAUTY SALON 


ROY E. BEAMAN 


46 Main St. 




PLYMOUTH, MASS. 




LEO'S 


THE VIOLIN SHOP 

ROGER S. KELLEN 


BARBER AND BEAUTY SHOPS 


Dealer in 

Old Violins, Violas, and Cellos 


Plymouth and Duxbury 


Large Assortment of Cases, Bows, Strings, etc. 
Artistic Repairing A Specialty 

9 Winslow St. Tel. 1420 Plymouth, Mass. 


Compliments of 


BENJAMIN D. LORING 




DIAMONDS, WATCHES, 


CEASAR'S 


JEWELRY, SILVERWARE 


DINE AND DANCE 


GIFTS AND CLOCKS 


Home Cooked Food 


Fine Repairing a Specialty 




28 Main St., Plymouth, Mass. 


Route 3 MANOMET 


All work done in our own shop 



• '— ' '— ' '—• '— ' '— ' '— ' '— " '— ' '— ' '— ' '— ' '— " '— " '— ' '— ' '— " '— ' '— ' '■— ' '— ' '— " '— ' '— " '— ' '— " '— ' '— ' '— ' '— ' — ' '•— • '— i — • 4- 



66 



THE PILGRIM 



>,_,._, ,_, ,_,,_, ,_, ,_, ,_, i».,»„»i ._, ,_, ,_, _, ,_„—,,_,,_,,_,,_,._, ,_►,,_, .... ,_, ,_, ,_ „_, ,_, ,_, ,_,,_., 



Plymouth Co-operative Federal 

Savings and Loan Association 



(Formerly PLYMOUTH CO-OPERATIVE BANK) 



Incorporated 1882 



Federalized 1937 



A. PERRY RICHARDS 
President 

ROBERT J. TUBBS 
Vice-Pres. and Treasurer 



WALTER R. AMESBURY 
Vice-President 

WALDER J. ENGSTROM 
Secretary and Asst. Treas. 




Insured SAFETY — Liberal YIELD 

INSIST UPON THESE TWO 
THINGS FOR YOUR SAVINGS 



HOME MORTGAGE LOANS 

THAT FIT YOUR BUDGET 

CALL OR WRITE FOR INFORMATION 



ilymouth Co-operative 
Federal Sayings 

AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 

Forti/'-four Afain St., 
Plymouth, Massachusetts. 



— + 



THE PILGRIM 



67 



Compliments of 

DR. HIRSON 



Compliments of 



VOLTA'S OIL CO. 



Compliments of 



A FRIEND 



Compliments of 
DR. DOUGLAS 



N. Phillips S. S. Agency 

Tickets For 

ALL CLASSES OF TRAVEL 



9 CUSHMAN ST. 
Plymouth 989-R 



A. CECCARELLI & SON 
TAILORS 

Cleansing and Tailoring 

304 Court St. PLYMOUTH, MASS. 

Tel. 941-R 



Compliments of 



AN ALUMNUS 



Compliments of 



DR. STEGMAIER 



HELEN'S BEAUTY SHOP 

BEAUTY CULTURE 
in All Its Branches 

19 COURT STREET 
Tel. 213-M 



68 



THE PILGRIM 



C. PAUL 

For Your 
SHOES AND REPAIRING 

Honest Values, Dependable Service 



52 Court St. 



PLYMOUTH 



CURRIER'S 

ICE CREAM 

Kemp's Candies and Nuts 

LUNCHEON 
Home Made Pastries 



63 Main Street 



PLYMOUTH 



The 

FAY SCHOOL 

For Girls 

52 Beacon Street 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

One-year and two-year courses in 
Academic and Secretarial Science 
offering, in addition to the conven- 
tional business courses, training in 
the development of attractive and 
efficient business personality. The 
environment is homelike and highly 
cultural. Catalog. 

M. IRENE FAY 

Director and Vocational Adviser 



Compliments of 



DANFORTH'S 



'Where Quality Prevails" 



Relief for ACID STOMACH 

BISMA - REX 

FOUR ACTION ANTACID POWDER 

Neutralizes Acidity — Removes Gas — Soothes Stomach 
— Assists Digestion 

Big Bottle 50c 

SAVE with SAFETY at 

COOPER DRUG COMPANY 
BEMIS DRUG COMPANY 

"The 6 Busy REXALL Stores" 
ABINGTON - N. ABINGTON - ROCKLAND 

"In Plymouth It's Cooper's" 

Protects That Orange Juice Flavor 
DRINK 

ORANGE 
KIST 

MADE WITH REAL JUICE 
From Tree -Ripened Valencia Oranges 

Rich juice flavor -- protected, sealed carbon- 
ation -- assurance of freshness, sanitation 
and wholesomeness. 

Choose your favorite in Kist Beverages -- 
Strawberry Kist, Lemon Kist, Lime Kist, 
Root Beer Kist, and many others. Ask your 
dealer -- look for the Kist Sign on his store. 

Carbonated. . to protect the flavor 
Scaled- ■ to insure freshness 



PLYMOUTH BOTTLING WORKS 

Incorporated 

124 Sandwich St., Plymouth 

Tel. 1623 -W 



THE PILGRIM 



69 



WALK-OVER SHOE STORE 

65 Main Street, Plymouth 



f WALK-OVER SHOES 
BASS MOCCASINS 
. I KAMP TRAMPS 

Agents tor •< douglas shoes 

GOODRICH LINE 

l^of Sneakers and Rubbers 



D. W. BESSE, Proprietor 



Compliments of 

GAMBINFS 



Compliments of 



CENTRAL CAFE 



45 Main Street 



Tel. 838 



Compliments of 
DR. E. HAROLD DONOVAN 



PETROLEUM SALES and SERVICE, Inc. 

Agents for 

THE ATLANTIC REFINING CO. 

Filtered Range and Fuel Oils White Flash Gasoline 

Atlantic High Film Strength Motor Oils 



HEDGE ROAD, 



PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



Telephone, Plymouth 1499 



Compliments of 


Compliments of 


NATIONAL "D" STORE 


J. F. TAYLOR 


27 SUMMER ST. 


DENTIST 


J. S. COHEN, Proprietor 




Compliments of 


PLYMOUTH & BROCKTON 


BANDER'S 


STREET RAILWAY CO. 


PLYMOUTH'S MOST POPULAR 


Ride Our 


WOMEN'S SHOP 


Modern Air Conditioned Buses 


54 Main St. Tel. 38 PLYMOUTH 


Sandwich St. PLYMOUTH 



70 



THE PILGRIM 



Compliments of 
DR. FRANK L. BAILEY 

OPTOMETRIST 



Russell Bldg. 



PLYMOUTH 



Telephone 1187-W 

Jim's Lunch & Restaurant 

Regular Dinners A La Carte Service 

Shore Dinners Our Specialty 



5 and 7 Main Street 



PLYMOUTH 



Compliments of 

RICHARDS 

SHOE REBUILDER 



When there is better work done, we will do it 
JOHN H. GOVI 

TAILOR 
Main Street PLYMOUTH 



Compliments of 

EARL W. GOODING 

Jeweler and Optometrist 



COUNTY AUTO SUPPLY, Inc. 

GAS AND OIL 
ACCESSORIES 



Main St. Ext. 



PLYMOUTH 



HAROLD VOLTA 

AND HIS ORCHESTRA 



Plymouth 



Tel. 840 



"We put Neiv Life in Old Shoes" 
PLYMOUTH SHOE HOSPITAL 

63^ Main St. PLYMOUTH 



DONOVAN & SULLIVAN 

ENGRAVING COMPANY 

Photo-Engravers 

470 ATLANTIC AVE. BOSTON, MASS. 



HARBOR BUILDING 



LIB. 8711 



Represented by 



P. V. CARTER 

PEMROKE, MASS. 



THE PILGRIM 



71 



STEVENS THE FLORIST 



FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 



Member of The Florist Telegraph Delivery Association 



9 COURT STREET 



H. A. BRADFORD 

Distributor for 
S. S. PIERCE SPECIALTIES 

Birdseye Frosted Foods 



1 Warren Ave. 



Tel. 1298-W 



FIRST NATIONAL STORES 



25 Main Street, Plymouth 



O. R. SAYRE 



W. G. WOOD 



Compliments of 



SHERMAN'S 



PLYMOUTH 



NO. PLYMOUTH 



Join us at 



HOWARD JOHNSON'S 



Plymouth Shop" 



(Open Evenings) 



72 



THE PILGRIM 



Does Your Boy Drink Milk? 




"Nook 
Farm 

Dairy 



is my 



milkman. 



I'm only 8 years old and am one of the healthiest 
boys in my class. That's why I am thankful to NOOK 
FARM DAIRY. My mother says that Nook Farm 
Products are always fresh and always best." 



Nook Farm Dairy 

"Country Fresh' 9 

T. FRED GREGSON, Mgr. 

NOOK ROAD Tel. 1262 PLYMOUTH 



THE PILGRIM 



73 




A GYPSY DANCED 

A gypsy danced, the stars and I looked on. 
And music sweet came from a distant hill; 
All else was blackness, moonlight having gone- 
A gypsy danced, the stars and I looked on; 
I dared not move, within me an emotion born 
Rendering me powerless beneath her will — 
A gypsy danced, the stars and I looked on, 
And music sweet came from a distant hill. 

A gypsy danced, the stars her castanets, 
Whirling, twirling beneath a blue-black sky; 
A graceful beauty's lovely silhouette — 
A gypsy danced, the stars her castanets, 
And I, by vague wild doubts beset — 
Looked on, and uttered not a sigh. 
A gypsy danced, the stars her castanets, 
Whirling, twirling beneath a blue-black sky. 






A. Stein '38 



THE APPLE TREE 

By the pasture bars it stood 

Crooked in the sun, 
Branches bent and knotted wood, 

Trunk and vines in one. 

No one even turned to glance 

At the grim old tree, 
Though the robins found romance 

In blissful ecstasy. 

Only once in early May 
It donned its flowery dress. 

Then no queen in proud array 
Wore such loveliness. 

All its crooked branches bore 

Wealth of fragile bloom, 
Every bent twig held a flower 

Pilled with sweet perfume. 

Frances Lodi '39 



74 



THE PILGRIM 



NAME 



AMBITION 






THE PILGRIM 



75 




76 THE PILGRIM 



LASELL 
JUNIOR COLLEGE 



Two-year courses 

for high school graduates: 

1. Liberal studies with English (including Journalism), a foreign 

language, Science, or Social Science as a major. 

2. Home Economics with Clothing or Foods as a major. 

3. Secretarial Science (Commerical or Medical). 

4. Merchandising. 

5. Academic Music with Piano, Voice, Organ, Violin, Cello," or Harp 

as a major. 

6. Art, including Fine Art, Commercial Art, and Crafts. 

7. Dramatic Expression. 

Various Combinations of the Above Courses Are Possible 

The Academic Music Course prepares students to take examinations for advanced standing 
in conservatories of the first rank. Chorus work, Glee Club and Orchestra. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS: 

A limited number of qualified students may arrange courses of 
Concentrated effort along certain lines, with the same privileges and ad- 
vantages ad students in the regular courses. 

HIGH SCHOOL: 

College Preparatory. The usual course modified to meet the needs 
d'f each student and adapted to the requirements of the particular college 
selected. 

GENERAL. Subjects chosen according to the aptitudes and needs of the students. 

Courses in Music, Art and Dramatic Expression are open to qualified students. 

For Catalog address 

LASELL JUNIOR COLLEGE 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



Northeastern 
University 




College of Liberal Arts 

Offers a broad program of college subjects serving as a foundation for the under- 
standing of modern culture, social relations, and technical achievement. The purpose of 
this program is to give the student a liberal and cultural education and a vocational 
competence which fits him to enter some specific type of useful employment. 

College of Business Administration 

Offers a college program with broad and thorough training in the principles of 
business with specialization in ACCOUNTING. BANKING AND FINANCE, or BUSINESS 
MANAGEMENT. Modern methods of instruction, including lectures, solution of business 
problems, class discussions, professional talks by business executives, and motion pictures 
of manufacturing processes, are used. 

College of Engineering 

Provides complete college programs in Engineering with professional courses in the 
fields of CIVIL, MECHANICAL (with DIESEL, AERONAUTICAL, and AIR CONDI- 
TIONING options), ELECTRICAL, CHEMICAL, INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING, and 
ENGINEERING ADMINISTRATION. General engineering courses are pursued during 
the freshman year; thus the student need not make a final decision as to the branch of 
engineering in which he wishes to specialize until the beginning of the sophomore year. 

Co-operative Plan 

The Co-operative Plan, which is available to upperclassmen in all courses, provides 
for a combination of practical industrial experience with classroom instruction. Under 
this plan the student is able to earn a portion of his school expenses as well as to make 
business contacts which prove valuable in later years. 



Bachelor of Arts 



Degrees Awarded 



Bachelor of Science 



FOR CATALOG — MAIL THIS COUPON AT ONCE 
Northeastern University 
Director of Admissions 
Boston, Massachusetts 



Please send me a catalog of the 
[ ] College of Liberal Arts 
[ ] College of Business Administration 
[ ] College of Engineering 



Name 



Address 



H-46